Chief Terrill Riley Cave City Kentucky


 

WBKO announced on September 13th that Cave City Kentucky now had a new Police Chief.  His name is Terrill Riley, and was formerly an Officer with the Police Department.

Terrill Riley, who’d been filling in as interim Cave City police chief, following the retirement of former Chief Jeff Wright, was appointed Monday to the position of chief.  LINK

Per WBKO: 

GLASGOW, Ky. (WBKO) — Last night, Chief Terrill Riley was appointed to Police Chief by Cave City Mayor, Dwyane Hatcher.


Although Chief Riley officially accepted the new position on Monday, he’s already starting to meet his goals during his time as Cave City’s Police Chief. ​ “One of the things I’m really looking forward to right now, and obviously it was one of my goals taking over as Chief is getting the D.A.R.E. program back in to Caverna Schools System up here.”  Chief Riley says the D.A.R.E. program will come back to the Caverna Schools System this October.

 

On the same day, this discussion was posted on TOPIX.Com

Dishonest

Elizabethtown, KY

#1 Monday Sep 12

I may be not up to date on laws and such but i do know that there are certain qualifications that have to be met to be chief and while i respect the man that received the position he did not possess all of the qualifications required to no fault of his other than just not enough time on the job to provide the training and experienced which he would have later. My point is that in order to be appointed chief the council had to vote to completely change the requirements of such which as they had other applicants fully qualified who had applied for the position and who were not even given the respect of an interview was very low and completely in my way of thinking not only disrespectful to the standing rules and city regulations with no concern for the people of the city and the fact that they deserve the very best that the other applicants weren’t even called in for interviews after being told they had a fair change, illegal!! Therefore each and everyone on the council and the mayor and everyone else concerned should be impeached and or fired from their positions since they use their power not for the better of the community but to fulfill their own pettiness and make up the rules as they go!! So so sad to have to abide in a place where the people who are supposed to be running our town and keeping our streets safe are the biggest crooks of them all as i said no disrespect to the chief but if he is the man i think he is, i believe he would agree that the existing requirements should stay in place and not be bent to play favoritism even to him knowing that he is young with plenty if time to be qualified by the existing rules which would be the only honorable and fair thing to do.   LINK

The links below are to several forum posts on TOPIX about Terrell Riley.

3/9/2012 Chief Minton Hires Terrill Riley

8/24/2011 Tire slasher Terrill Riley takes council

1/11/11 – Apparently someone did not care for him as their Landlord!  TERRILL RILEY

Terrell Riley

1/7/2010  where did terrill riley post go?

wheres terrill

Apparently, this story sums up how Terrill Riley was slipped into the role of Police Chief of Cave City after Police Chief Jeff Wright announced his retirement on May 27 after an incident report was filed, dated Feb. 17, stating the city has received a written complaint against Wright and Capt. Chris Edwards from Stacy Estes Monroe, owner of Learning Tree Day Care.  In her formal complaint, Monroe said Wright and Edwards “used professional tactics of power and control to intimidate and harass me and my staff. I was also threatened by Chief Jeff Wright that he would contact the state police and the media over this issue and I would lose kids.”  LINK TO STORY HERE

Chief Riley has said that getting the D.A.R.E Program back into Caverna Schools is a priority. 

New Cave City police chief will bring D.A.R.E. to local school

As far as the D.A.R.E. Program is concerned, here is an article which seems to say that it just did not work. 

Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates, who believed that “casual drug users should be taken out and shot,” founded the DARE program, which was quickly adopted nationwide.  LINK

Additionally, there is this article published by TIME in February of 2001:  Just Say No to DARE

How Police Chief Riley does during his first year in this position will remain to be seen.  People change and this is a small town with everyone knowing most everyone else, or at least having heard about them!  Chief Riley may turn out to be a good choice for Cave City.  We will see how it plays out. 

Comments on this post are welcomed!

Following a unanimous vote Monday night by City Council members, Cave City accepted a land donation of 40 acres, located beside the Cave City Convention Center


 

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On December 16th, it was announced via WBKO Television News that the Gaunce family had donated a piece of land adjacent to the Cave City Convention Center, to be used for an Industrial Park for the City.

The land was valued at $650,000, a price Smith said the city never would have been able to afford on their own.

Cave City did purchase a small section of land that joined the portion the Gaunce family gave them in hopes of building a nice  entrance to the industrial park, as well as fulfilling some requirements set by the State Highway Department.

Robert Smith stated in that article that, “Cave City has always been known as a tourist town and up until this point that’s been really good for us; however, tourism industry has changed. We need an everyday tax base for us, we need jobs that people can go to without having to travel so far,”

I would beg to differ with that argument because everywhere I look I see “help wanted” signs around the area.  There seems to be plenty of employment opportunities available for that type of work.  They do seem to be having a hard time filling those positions judging from the signs and advertisements that are all over the road and in the media as well.  One of the reasons for that is that every job is requiring a “drug test” be submitted before employment which, we all know, is biased against anyone who smokes Cannabis for any reason.

So why do we need an Industrial Park sitting in the main area which is the “entrance” to the town of “Cave City”?  A place which has always been a tourist town and the place to go to see small town life and Nature as well?  A place that can’t fill all of the industrial type of jobs that it currently has, let alone more?  Doe’s anyone living in the Cave City area see a reason to build this Industrial Park for more jobs?  We need small shop owners and café’s to reopen in the area, as well as some types of agribusinesses, not factories or other monstrous businesses. 

Per the report,  in a unanimous vote on December 14th, by the City Council members, Cave City chose to accept a land donation of 40 acres, located beside the Cave City Convention Center.  This gift was donated by the Gaunce family, who, incidentally , SOLD Cave City a small parcel of land adjacent to this property to be used for the “Entrance”.

The City Council includes the following six members, according to the Cave City official website: Gary Hogan, Seaborn Ellzey, Gary Minor, Kevin Houchens, Denny Doyle and
Steve Pedigo.  The Cave City Council Meeting is the second Monday of the Month, so the next meeting will be January 11th, 2016*. 

The Glasgow Times reported that the property is actually owned by Wayne Gaunce, according to his son, Patrick. 

“I guess if anything that should be said it should be that Cave City has been good to our family, and this is a small way that we can be good to Cave City,” said Patrick Gaunce.

Additionally in the Glasgow Times,  Mayor Dwayne Hatcher said, “The main purpose I feel of government is to provide for the needs of the citizens,” said Mayor Dwayne Hatcher. “I feel like we have done that. Have we done everything that needs to be done?  No, but I think we have made progress and will continue to do so.”

According to the same article in the Glasgow Times, in February, the city received a $100,000 grant from the Industrial Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County to use for the purpose of acquiring property and developing it into an industrial park.

Why couldn’t the Gaunce family donate this land to Cave City ‘just because’?  In other words, why must it be used for an Industrial Park in the middle of a Tourist town?  Why does everything have to ‘progress’ to industrial?  How about we use the donated land and grant money to plant and promote ‘industrial Hemp farming’ on that property?  And the unoccupied property at the corner of 101 Broadway can be turned into a ‘Cannabis Café’ and by Spring of 2017 we will have a boom town in Kentucky with plenty of jobs for all of the people…even the ones that occasionally smoke Marijuana!

Coming from a large city I have seen first hand the damage an industrialized zone does to residential areas.  It is not a pretty site to see.   The pollution is not wanted or needed here, (we get enough of Louisville’s already),  and even if the ‘business’ produces little to even no pollution of it’s own (which is doubtful), the extra exhaust from the traffic will be noticeable to say the least.  We need to protect the environment, the agricultural heritage and the people of Cave City. 

Put some cow’s and Hemp on that land…. and keep the Industry out!

Also of note,

Posted: Friday, February 13, 2015 11:52 pm

By JAMES BROWN / Glasgow Daily Times

The IDEA board entered closed session to discuss property. The Infrastructure Committee of the Glasgow-Barren County Chamber of Commerce has identified property that could be developed for industrial needs. The committee members were on hand to give a presentation of those properties in closed session. LINK

 

 

*Anyone interested in attending the Cave City Council Meeting on January 11th, 2016 please email me at shereekrider@usmjparty.com or contact me thru Facebook at THIS LINK.

 

 

Information obtained from these links:

A year to remember for Cave City

Donation sets Cave City on track for new Industrial Park

Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County

Glasgow/Barren Co. IDEA

Incentive Programs

Floyd Collins, Wayne Gaunce are inducted into Hall of Fame

Gaunce Management Inc.

Houchens Industries Inc.

Barren County Property Valuation Administrator

Cave City receives $100K grant

Support Sen. Perry Clark: SB57 and SB76 (2017)


NORML

Legislation filed by Senator Perry Clark of Louisville, SB 57, seeks to establish a statewide, comprehensive medical marijuana program.

Senate Bill 57, The Cannabis Compassion Act, establishes regulations overseeing the establishment of state-licensed dispensaries to provide medical marijuana to qualified patients. It also permits patients to home cultivate their own supply of medical cannabis.

Senator Clark said: “Too many Kentuckians have had their lives stymied with criminal records as a result of nonviolent marijuana convictions. That is wrong. It is time to stop making criminals out of citizens due to outdated and ridiculous laws concerning cannabis.”

Under present state law, the possession of any amount of cannabis is classified as a criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to 45 days in jail, a fine, and a criminal record.

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have enacted statewide provisions allowing patients access to cannabis therapy. Data from other states finds that the enactment of medical marijuana access is associated with lower rates of opioid abuse and mortality, and does not negatively impact workplace safety, teen use, or motor vehicle safety.

Kentucky patients deserve these same protections.

Click here to contact your Senator and urge their support for this measure.

Additionally, Senator Clark has introduced Senate Bill 76, to legalize the possession and use of limited amounts of marijuana for those over the age of 21.

SB 76, the Cannabis Freedom Act, allows adults to possess up to one ounce of cannabis, to cultivate up to five cannabis plants, to store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; and to transfer up to one ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration.

Eight states, encompassing some 20 percent of the US population, have enacted similar adult use regulations. 

Click here contact your Senator and urge their support piece of legislation as well.

Thanks for all you do,
The NORML Team

P.S. Our work is supported by thousands of people throughout the country as we work to advance marijuana reform in all 50 states and the federal level. Can you kick in $10 or $25 a month to help us keep going?

NORML and the NORML Foundation: 1100 H Street NW, Suite 830, Washington DC, 20005
Tel: (202) 483-5500 • Fax: (202) 483-0057 • Email: norml@norml.org

https://legiscan.com/KY/research/SB57/2017

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB76/2017

Kentucky may see gun-free school zones become a thing of the past with new Republican bill


Brandon Morse Jan 6, 2017 7:00 pm

Kentucky may see gun-free school zones become a thing of the past with new Republican bill

Statistics show that gun-free zones just do not work. Over seven years, 92% of mass shootings have occurred on gun-free zones, and some of these locations have been schools. It’s an occurrence that some schools, like one elementary school in Texas, are looking to put a stop to by arming themselves with both firearms and the knowledge on how to use them efficiently and tactically. Yet, the problem of gun-free zones in schools remains.

That’s why Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky) is looking to put a stop to them in the state of Kentucky by introducing a bill he calls the “Safe Students Act.”

In a press release from his office, Massie explained that he has introduced H.R. 34 because our children are consistently in danger due to gunmen walking into schools unopposed, and murdering innocents.

“Gun-free school zones are ineffective. They make people less safe by inviting criminals into target-rich, no-risk environments,” said Massie. “Gun-free zones prevent law-abiding citizens from protecting themselves, and create vulnerable populations that are targeted by criminals.”

The Safe Students Act has garnered the support of three major gun organizations: National Association for Gun Rights, Gun Owners of America, and the National Rifle Association…

Cosponsors include: Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX), Rep. James Comer (R-KY), Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA), and Rep. Brian Babin (R-TX).

Common sense says that anyone looking to shoot up a place may think twice, or fail miserably, when the intended victims have the capability to shoot back. So does history, as John Lott wrote in National Review in October 2015.

Since at least 1950, all but two public mass shootings in America have taken place where general citizens are banned from carrying guns. In Europe, there have been no exceptions. Every mass public shooting — and there have been plenty of mass shooting in Europe — has occurred in a gun-free zone. In addition, they have had three of the six worst K–12 school shootings, and Europe experienced by far the worst mass public shooting perpetrated by a single individual (Norway in 2011, which from the shooting alone left 67 people dead and 110 wounded).

With these facts in mind, eliminating gun-free zones on schools is a no brainer.

CONTINUE READING…

 

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/34/text

"Year of the Bible"


Glasgow Christians bring in New Year by reading entire Bible

Glasgow marathon one of more than 70 statewide

Glasgow Christians bring in New Year by reading entire Bible

Across the state, groups of Christians are ringing in the New Year with marathon readings of the entire Bible.    

At midnight in the Glasgow City Council Chamber, a group began with Genesis and expects to reach the end of the book sometime Wednesday.  

Jeff Cooper, a member of the River Ministries in Glasgow, facilitated the event this year and last. 

In 2016, volunteers took turns reading the Bible from beginning to end outside the Barren County Courthouse in downtown Glasgow, he said.  

“It really just pierced my heart when I saw it and I knew it was something we had to have every year,” he said. “People were able to connect with people who had a heart for God.”  

This year, Glasgow is allowing the group to hold its marathon reading in the City Council Chamber. 

The less visible City Council Chamber location has resulted in far fewer people stopping by to hear readings, Cooper said, though the location is not without benefits. 

“We are warm, we are dry and we are really appreciative of that,” he said.

A county away, Immanuel Ministry Church led an effort in the Thomas House in Horse Cave to read through the New Testament as well as the books of Psalms and Joel.

Last year, the group read the entire Bible but decided to scale back the project’s ambition this year, Phillip Trent, the church’s pastor, said.

In 2016, roughly a dozen people participated, but about half as many were involved in this year’s event, which lasted 23 hours, he said.

Trent said he thinks the marathon has been beneficial for the participants.

“This is a unifying thing,” he said. “We just repeat what God said and we believe His word still has power.”

Mark Harrell, pastor of Victory Christian Fellowship in Somerset, started the KY 120 United Bible Reading Marathon.

A section in the second chapter of the book of Acts, in which the Holy Spirit visits a group of 120 believers, inspired him to create the event, he said.

Noting that Kentucky has 120 counties, he decided to start a grassroots effort to unite Kentuckians across the state through faith, he said. 

“It talks there (about) how they came into one accord,” Harrell said. “We have 120 counties together and we’re trying to bring unity for Christians,” he said. 

Roughly halfway through 2015, Harrell started telling pastors he knew in other counties about what he was planning and the word spread, culminating in a Bible reading marathon in about 90 Kentucky counties, he said. 

This year, there are marathons in about 75 counties, adding that this is mainly because he started telling people about the event in October, he said. 

Though some of the Bible marathons throughout the state are taking place in government buildings, there is otherwise no government involvement, Harrell said. 

“It’s faceless. It’s nameless. It’s people saying, ‘we want to take a stand,’ ” he said. “They’re saying ‘This is what we believe and we’re going to stand up and proclaim what we believe.”  

Harrell also said he was thrilled about a Dec. 19 proclamation from governor Matt Bevin declaring 2017 the “Year of the Bible.”

“That just helps bring greater validity to our faith that the nation was founded on,” Harrell said. 

Cooper also praised the proclamation and said, “We feel that God’s word is the final word. I feel like the state is coming into agreement with that.” 

The American Civil Liberties Union disapproves of the governor’s proclamation.

Amber Duke, ACLU’s communications director, said that proclamations don’t carry “the full force” of law. “Nonetheless, we find it disappointing that he prioritized this over a lot of other things going on in the state,” she said. 

Duke described the proclamation as an effort to endorse Bevin’s own religious beliefs. 

“I was hoping this governor who talks so much about unity would be more inclusive about the things he chooses to endorse,” she said.   

— Follow reporter Jackson French on Twitter @Jackson_French or visit bgdailynews.com

CONTINUE READING…

Coal Miners continue to suffer on this, the last day of 2016….for some, nothing changes, it only gets worse.


 

 

Image result for kentucky coal mines

 

Below is two stories which caught my eye this morning concerning coal mining and coal miners.  It is the last day of 2016 and still, they suffer.  Between job loss and illness and an ultimate death from Black Lung, these people who have worked their entire lives to dig coal so that we have electricity for all of our needs, have suffered their entire lives as slaves to the Corporate system, who entrenched them in this line of work.  Appalachia and surrounding area is home to some of the most poor people in America.  They were born into mining.  Entire families work in the mines.  They were never taught to do anything else.  And if they all quit today, what would we do for electricity to power all of the gadgets and contraptions that we rely on today, such as the laptop and light I am using now to write this?

Please see the stories below and remember to say a prayer for our Miners and their families today.

SK

 

President Nixon Signs Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act: December 30, 1969

 

On December 30, 1969, President Richard Nixon signed into law the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act.  Since the Monograph mine disaster in Marion County more than 60 years earlier, Congress had been passing laws to address coal mine safety. However, most were filled with loopholes or lacked funding for enforcement.

The tide turned after another Marion County disaster. The 1968 Farmington explosion killed 78 miners. Americans watched in horror as the drama unfolded on national TV. 

After the disaster, Congressman Ken Hechler paid to bring hundreds of miners and the widows of the Farmington miners to protest at the nation’s capitol. Black lung doctors rallied miners in the coalfields and testified before Congress about unsafe mining conditions. And in the spring of 1969, 40,000 miners defied their union and went on strike to support the legislation.

The resulting law increased mine inspections; allowed the government to shut down unsafe mines; placed stricter limits on coal dust; improved ventilation, roof supports, and methane detection; and provided compensation to miners suffering from black lung. The landmark legislation ultimately led to a significant decrease in deaths from coal mining.

CONTINUE

 

Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge In Appalachia

 

Across Appalachia, coal miners are suffering from the most serious form of the deadly mining disease black lung in numbers more than 10 times what federal regulators report, an NPR investigation has found.

The government, through the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, reported 99 cases of “complicated” black lung, or progressive massive fibrosis, throughout the country the last five years.

But NPR obtained data from 11 black lung clinics in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio, which reported a total of 962 cases so far this decade. The true number is probably even higher, because some clinics had incomplete records and others declined to provide data.

“The actual extent of PMF in U.S. coal miners remains unclear,” says the report, which appears in this week’s issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“I can’t say that I’ve heard really anything worse than this in my career,” says Robert Cohen, a pulmonologist at the University of Illinois, Chicago who studies and tracks black lung.

“I can’t think of anything in this particular field … that’s more frightening than this,” Cohen adds.

Edward “Lee” Petsonk of West Virginia University has spent three decades addressing the disease and finds NPR’s numbers “very disheartening, very disappointing.”

“I’ve spent much of my career trying to find ways to better protect miners’ respiratory health,” Petsonk says. “It’s almost like I’ve failed.”

NIOSH released a report Thursday, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, which focuses on a small health clinic in Kentucky with 60 cases alone of PMF in 20 months. The report acknowledges cases are being missed by the government’s count; it concludes: “The actual extent of PMF in U.S. coal miners remains unclear.”

“The more I talk, the more I get out of breath”

Mackie Branham, 39, of Elkhorn Creek, Ky., spent 19 years mining coal until he was diagnosed with complicated black lung. He ran monstrous mining machines and drilled bolts into mine roofs — occupations NIOSH says can involve excessive mine dust exposure. He worked double shifts and seven-day weeks every chance he had.

His gallbladder was removed one day and he says he was back at work the next. He took two days, he says, after knee surgery, before working a 12-hour shift drilling bolts. But severe breathing problems forced him to leave work in March. And he struggles for every breath now.

“My dad has got it. Everybody that has got it, got it when they had like first stage or so. I’ll probably be the first born to be this bad in the family,” Branham says, describing a family legacy of black lung.

“They can’t breathe but they can still get up and walk around and do stuff. The more I talk, the more I get out of breath. It’s like I ain’t got no capacity.”

 

Branham was diagnosed with PMF at United Medical Group, a clinic in Coal Run Village, Ky., that was the subject of the NIOSH study. Radiologist Brandon Crum was alarmed by the numbers of miners coming in with such severe disease, including some like Branham, who were in their 30s and 40s and worked less than 20 years underground. So he contacted NIOSH researchers.

“I think the percentage of black lung that we’re seeing now here in central Appalachia is unprecedented in any recorded data that I can find anywhere,” Crum says. “In this clinic we’re roughly around 9 to 10 percent complicated rate, which is around three times higher than even the highest reported numbers.”

NIOSH researchers gathered at the clinic and verified the diagnoses. They, too, were alarmed.

 

Black Lung Returns To Coal Country

“The current numbers are unprecedented by any historical standard,” says NIOSH epidemiologist Scott Laney, who has focused on black lung as well as the recent Ebola outbreak in Africa.

“We had not seen cases of this magnitude ever before in history in central Appalachia.”

Crum tells NPR he diagnosed 10 more cases of PMF since Laney and his colleagues left the clinic.

In three years, 644 cases

Life with PMF is bleak. It’s incurable and fatal.

Fifty-three-year-old Charles Wayne Stanley of Pound, Va., is matter-of-fact about his future.

“Staying on oxygen 24/7, dying of suffocation, that’s what I’ve got to look forward to,” Stanley says, as he sits in a clinic in St. Charles, Va.

“I’ve seen it too many times. My wife’s grandpa … [I] watched him take his last breath. I watched my uncle die with black lung. You literally suffocate because you can’t get enough air. That’s my prospects.”

Stanley says his diagnosis includes black lung and silicosis.

In just the last three years, 644 cases of complicated black lung were diagnosed at Stone Mountain Health Services, which operates black lung clinics in St. Charles and two other Virginia communities. That’s six times the NIOSH national count in nearly half the time.

Ron Carson is the director of the Black Lung Program at Stone Mountain Health Services in St. Charles, Va. “Something major is going on,” he says.

“I’m not an epidemiologist or a scientist or a doctor,” says Ron Carson, who manages the clinics. “I just see the results that come through the doors, and something is going on. Something major is going on.”

Laney and his colleagues acknowledge in their paper that they have missed hundreds of cases with their national surveillance program. By law, they can X-ray only working miners and the testing is voluntary. NIOSH data show most miners avoid that testing. Only 17 percent of all working Kentucky miners were tested in the NIOSH program since 2011.

Stanley waited until he was out of work, after 30 years mining coal, before he got his first chest X-ray. Miners avoid the NIOSH testing, he says, because they worry it could cost them their jobs.

“If you’re working and you go and have that stuff done and the company finds out about it, they’ll find a way to get rid of you,” Stanley says. “As long as you’re working and producing you’re an asset. But now when you get something wrong with you, you become a liability. And they’ll find a way to get rid of you.”

The last company a miner worked for (for at least a year) is saddled with black lung benefits payments and medical care — even if the miner spent 20 years working somewhere else in excessive dust. It’s the last employer who pays.

But it’s against the law to punish or fire miners for getting X-rays or being diagnosed with disease. Bruce Watzman of the National Mining Association also says mining companies are not supposed to see the X-rays.

“Those results are not shared with any employer. It’s at the miner’s discretion the way the program operates today when and if to divulge that information,” Watzman says.

Still, the fear is widespread. So missing from the official NIOSH counts in the last 40 years are the working miners avoiding X-rays, and miners who are retired or laid off.

More than 40,000 miners lost their jobs since 2010. Six hundred mines have closed. And those out of work are now flocking to clinics to get screened for the disease and apply for black lung benefits. Last year alone, 3,000 miners showed up at the Stone Mountain clinics.

“I’m seeing miners now feeling that there’s no hope. I think that they have really come to the realization that there’s other energy out there now that is going to override any coal,” Carson says.

With the increased testing, more cases of complicated black lung are being diagnosed.

“Pure rock dust”

Cohen, Laney and other black lung experts believe thinner coal seams in central Appalachia are likely to blame for spikes in complicated black lung. The thickest seams are mostly gone. The thin seams that remain have coal embedded in rock, and that rock contains quartz. Cutting quartz and coal together results in mine dust that includes silica, which is especially toxic in lung tissue. Stanley worked in so much dust he labeled his mining machine the dust dragon.

“They kept getting less coal and more rock. So you’re cutting 19 inches of coal, you’re cutting 50-60 inches of rock,” Stanley recalls. “And the more rock you cut the more dust you’re going to eat.”

PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

"Saving Sable" – Help this child realize that there are good people in this World who DO care…


16288952_1480126969.1403_funddescription

Hello my name is Sable. I am 3 1/2 year oid chocolate Labrador retriever. I was hit by a car and I need surgery done. without the surgery I won’t live.

it’s a $1000 for the surgery.

please everyone keep her in your prayers

donations can be sent to Lakeside Animal  Health 6641 Scottsville Road Glasgow Kentucky 421 41 OR

Donate thru GOFUNDME ACCOUNT AT THIS LINK!

Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state …


 

Marijuana Legalization laws hit the books in Kentucky in 2017.

 

Almost one year after filing the Cannabis Freedom Act, Kentucky State Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state.

Filed on December 6 for the January, 2017, legislative season, the new bill is called the Cannabis Compassion Act and is filed as BR 409. Nevertheless, little has changed between the wording of the proposed laws of 2015, 2016, and the new 2017 Cannabis Freedom Act.

Now, voters will get another chance to see if this Kentucky marijuana legalization bill will fizzle out or get accepted into law.

Alternatively, the fact that recent elections have replaced some candidates could mean the newcomers are more receptive to marijuana legalization than their predecessors.

Before the elections, Norml gave most of Kentucky’s congressional members a poor rating for their lack of support for any type of marijuana legalization. The exceptions are Republican pro-marijuana legalization advocates Senator Rand Paul and Representative Thomas Massie.

In particular, it was noted that many Republican Kentuckians in the House of Representatives voted against the 2016 Veterans Equal Access Amendment.

While these elected officials in the U.S. House of Representatives might not be voting for federal legalization of medical marijuana or cannabis, there is still hope that the Kentucky State Senate will have new members that decide to vote for marijuana legalization.

Ballotpedia points out that the Kentucky State Senate had “19 of 38 total seats… up for election in 2016.” The outcome of this election did have some surprises, such as a large number of state senators running for re-election while also being unopposed.

Another interesting note in history is that the current bipartisan makeup of 11 Democrats and 27 Republicans in the Kentucky State Senate has remained the same before and after the election.

This meant that there was no shift in the number of Democrats or Republicans at the Kentucky State Senate before or after the November 8 elections, but there will be a few newly elected officials voting on the Cannabis Compassion Act in 2017.

On the other hand, Kentucky might need to worry about Republicans voting against marijuana legalization because many members of the GOP are not as anti-marijuana legalization as they were in the recent past.

For example, Atlantic quoted Bill Bennett, former Education Secretary under George W. Bush, at a panel discussion at the Conservative Political Action Conference, titled “Rocky Mountain High: Does Legalized Pot Mean Society’s Going Up In Smoke?” During the panel discussion in 2014, Bill Bennett said there “used to be a strong conservative coalition opposed to drugs.”

However, in 2014, it was clear to Bill Bennett and other GOP members that the conservative anti-marijuana legalization viewpoint was dissipating in the face of mounting public support for legalization. Bennett concluded with the sentiment that Republicans are “fighting against the tide” on the legal marijuana issue.

In the past, the issues with marijuana legalization in Kentucky in 2016 centered on behind-closed-doors meetings about the proposed law.

Two Kentucky state senators that were commonly quoted as being unsure about passing a marijuana legalization law in the state were John Schickel and Jimmy Higdon. Both of these senators are still in elected positions, and this means they will have another chance to vote on marijuana legalization in January, 2017.

For example, the last update about the 2016 marijuana legalization law in Kentucky was around September, according to WFPL. At that time, it was determined that the 2016 Cannabis Freedom Act was “assigned to a committee but never received a hearing.”

Kentucky state senator Jimmy Higdon was quoted at that time saying that he was not sure how the bill would manifest, and also said marijuana legalization might only be implemented for “end-of-life situations.”

Although Senator Jimmy Higdon’s remarks stand out, an attempt to push the 2017 Cannabis Compassion Act may not be futile despite it being denied in the past. For instance, it appears the Kentucky State Senate was expecting there to be another marijuana legalization bill to vote on in 2017.

In July, North Kentucky Tribune spoke with Kentucky state senator John Schickel, and he was paraphrased as saying that while the Cannabis Freedom Act “never made it to the Senate floor for a vote,” the issue is still considered relevant and “legislators want to further research the issue prior to the start of next year’s session in January [2017].”

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, other pre-filed bills for Kentucky to vote on in 2017 include increasing penalties related to narcotics.

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KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED TO FUND SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT CENTER


FunZilla is a state-of-the-art entertainment center to be located in Glasgow, Kentucky.

“FunZilla is committed to doing business well, as well as doing good with our business.”

— Charles Massie

GLASGOW, KY, USA, December 1, 2016 /EINPresswire.com/ — Glasgow, KY – A Kickstarter campaign has officially been launched for ‘FunZilla’, a state-of-the-art indoor Family Entertainment Center to be located in South Central Kentucky. The Kickstarter campaign aims to garner widespread support and financial backing to finance the acquisition of land and construction of the center. Projected opening of FunZilla will be in July, 2017.
Located just outside the city of Glasgow, Kentucky and only 8 miles from Interstate I-65, FunZilla will be housed within a 30,000 square foot building, situated on 3 acres of open land. FunZilla will be an entertainment center that offers a feature-packed, easy to reach party environment for groups of many sizes. The Company’s future plans include an ever expanding menu of party options, attractions and family enticements. FunZilla will feature a unique layout which will allow parents to join in the fun with their children, or simply enjoy watching them romp from a lounge with a set of viewing windows.
Inspired from the realization that a family-friendly, climate-controlled entertainment center didn’t exist in the immediate area, founder Charles Massie set out to provide a cost-effective solution that would appeal to all age groups and function as a leader in the community. “FunZilla provides numerable activities and events for everyone to find interest in. We call it the “Disneyland Effect”. Said Massie. “Most importantly, this also provides strong reasons for you to return regularly to the center for casual fun, special events and concerts. This will not be a “been there done that” experience.”
Some of the key features that will make FunZilla a major play destination for South Central Kentucky include; a gorgeous themed attractions incorporating interactive technology, an 18-hole miniature golf course, a video driving range, video batting cages, a rock climbing wall, and an amusement arcade packed with the latest games.
“FunZilla is committed to doing business well, as well as doing good with our business. We will follow ethical, sustainable, and transparent practices to make sure that we have the best social and environmental impact possible,” says Massie.
Kickstarter is a funding platform for creative projects. Everything from films, games, and music to art, design, and technology. ‘Backers’ who support a project on Kickstarter get an inside look at the creative process, and help that project come to life. All ‘Backers’ of the FunZilla Kickstarter campaign who pledge $25 or more will receive free admission to FunZilla for a family of four, plus a special gift from the Company. Additional rewards are available at higher pledge levels.
The Kickstarter campaign is officially open until January 1, 2017. For more information about the Kickstarter campaign, visit: http://kck.st/2fiv7D2

Charles Massie
FunZilla Family Entertainment Center
615-306-9481
email us here

SOURCE LINK

Legalize marijuana for the state’s sake


legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Editorial Board

In 1996 California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. Since then 28 more states have approved the drug for medical use, with another eight, including California, allowing adults to use the drug recreationally. Unfortunately, Kentucky has been slow to adapt, despite the many benefits legalizing the drug would provide.

Back in the day, Kentucky used to thrive growing tobacco. That same land, rich for growing tobacco, is ideal for growing marijuana, which can also be used to produce hemp, a versatile product which can be manufactured into paper, textiles, clothing, food, plastic, and a multitude of other products. 

Marijuana would also be useful as a medical alternative for many in the state who are dependent on prescription drugs. 

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kentucky has the highest cancer rates of any state in the country, largely due to our large dependence on the coal and mining industries, which has left countless hard-working Kentuckians with lung cancer. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has said that marijuana kills cancer cells along with alleviating the nausea and other symptoms associated with chemotherapy, which poses a much more effective alternative to prescription drugs. 

With so much of our state crippled by a dying coal industry, legalizing marijuana would be an enormous jobs creator for people looking to farm the crop and others looking to get into the business side of the industry with dispensaries. 

While stigmas still exist surrounding the drug, the issue of marijuana legalization is slowly becoming more of a bipartisan issue that draws support from both Democrats and Republicans, including Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin, who has said in the past that he plans to sign a medical marijuana bill into law during his time in office.

 

It has become a trend in the mainstream media to avoid one of the most pressing issues, not …

States that have approved the drug for recreational use, such as Colorado, tax the drug, and use the money in a variety of ways, from helping the homeless, to improving infrastructure and education. In 2016 alone, Colorado is expected to bring in over $1 billion in tax revenue from marijuana. 

If a similar system of policy was applied in the Bluegrass, money could be used for better education throughout the state, a hot-button issue under Bevin’s administration due to his proposed, but unsuccessful, cuts to higher education. Revenue could also go towards helping revitalize eastern Ky. along with infrastructure, homeless, and veterans, following in the footsteps of Colorado’s successful endeavor with the green. 

According to a 2012 poll by Kentucky Health Issues, 78 percent of Kentuckians support the legalization of medical marijuana. It’s time for our lawmaker’s throughout the state to come together and enact a policy to reflect the will of the people. The longer we wait, the more potential tax revenue we miss out on that could go to benefitting Kentuckians in need. It’s time to

“Make Kentucky Green Again!”

Email opinions@kykernel.com

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Mammoth Cave closes Houchin Ferry access to Green River


  • BY GINA KINSLOW gkinslow@glasgowdailytimes.com
  • Green River

    MAMMOTH CAVE NATIONAL PARK — The deterioration of the Green River Lock and Dam No. 6 near Brownsville, which has caused the level of the Green River to drop, has spurred Mammoth Cave National Park officials to close river access at Houchin Ferry.

    The announcement was made Wednesday by the national park.

    “We have blockaded it. We have put barriers up. The pavement ends and then there is this drop-off of about 9 feet so we don’t want anybody going down there and thinking it’s OK to back their boat into the water and find out the water is 9 feet below where it used to be,” said Vickie Carson, public information officer for the national park. “Right now we don’t want canoes and kayaks launching there just because the banks are super saturated. It’s just a hazardous situation.”

    Work crews with the national park were out on the Green River on Tuesday, checking the water level.

    The water level of the river has fallen due to a hole under the right side of the dam structure, which indicates a partial failure of the dam.

    Carol Labashosky, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, explained that the lower part of the dam has been washing away and over time has created the hole.

    “Instead of the water flowing over the top of the dam, it is flowing through the dam,” she said, adding this could cause the dam to breach or fail.

    The corps of engineers is watching the dam to see what happens.

    “It’s hard to predict how severe it will get,” Labashosky said. “The corps is just trying to let the public know it is in very serious condition and that it is hazardous.”

    The lock and dam were built in 1904-1905 and put into operation in 1906. The corps of engineers ceased operation of the lock and dam in 1951 due to a lack of commercial navigation and allowed it to fail and restore the river to its natural condition, she said.

    “What we are doing is just keeping communications open with stakeholders, (and) putting out information on the condition,” Labashosky said. “That’s basically what we are doing. We can’t predict when it will completely go into the water. The main thrust is that it will ultimately breach but that would not cause any economic or public safety issues.”

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