Barren County Courthouse, Glasgow, KY

A Statue of “Our Confederate Dead” stands outside the Courthouse in Glasgow, Kentucky.

Mammoth Cave, Barren County KY

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Historic Railway


March 7, 2018 Today In Frankfort; Praying for HB 166 !

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As I sat here patiently waiting for the Kentucky Legislature to take a vote on HB 166, I was thinking of a way to say,


to ALL of the people who took a stand this year in Kentucky!

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Jaime Montalvo   Justin Lewandoski   Eric Michelle Crawford   Pat Dunegan   Jennifer Dunegan   Dan Seum   Sally Oh   Dan Malano Seum   Tony Ashley   Elihu Shepherd   Tim Simpson   Henry Fox   Gina Daugherty   Chad Wilson    Thomas Tony Vance    Rebecca Collins   Blackii Effing Whyte 

There are many more which have not been listed here! 

Remembering also those that have in past years took up this fight and were the leaders from the beginning!

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Gatewood Galbraith – Wikipedia   Galbraith supported the legalization of recreational marijuana use, arguing that the framers of the US Constitution “did not say we have a Constitutional right to possess alcohol. They said we have a Constitutional right to privacy in our homes, under which fits the possession of an extremely poisonous alcohol. Now this is the law in Kentucky today. In fact, it is these rulings that keep the Kentucky State Police from kicking down the doors of people possessing alcohol in Kentucky’s 77 ‘dry’ counties right now and hauling their butts off to jail. Now Marijuana is a demonstrably less harmful substance than alcohol and presents far less of threat to public welfare. So it also fits in a person’s right to privacy in their home. It’s beyond the police power of the state as long as I don’t sell it and it’s for my own personal use.”[10]

Craig Lee   Tony Adkins  Ron Moore  David Weigand   Angela Gatewood   Erin Grossman Vu  Robin Rider-Osborne   Paula Willett  Cher Ford-mccullough Brian McCullough  Mary Thomas-Spears  Lynne Wilson  Roland A. Duby   Hugh Yonn  Patrick Moore  

Again, I have missed so many names that should be listed here! 

Many people put their own lives on hold to take on Kentucky’s Cannabis battle, whether it be for medicinal, recreational or even palliative care, they all took a stand…and walked all the way to Frankfort to prove it.    Not literally, of course.  I hope they all had a decent ride to get there but surely there were a few old broken down cars in the parking lot as well.  But by the time they all left there yesterday evening it felt as though they had  literally walked those miles.

All different types of people working toward one cause – to get some kind of Cannabis reform into Kentucky!

At the end of the day, the vote for HB 166 was passed over!  A very disappointing outcome for many thousands of Kentuckians who very much needed that Bill to pass! 

How is it possible that legislation so favored by the citizens has not already become law? What is it about this legislation that has Kentucky’s legislators so scared that they are willing to buck the will of the majority of the citizens?
I am of course talking about the legalization of cannabis for medical uses. With 80% favorability and a multitude of benefits arising from the use of cannabis it is confounding to see the Assembly leadership refuse the will of the people and bury all cannabis bills in committee. For what purpose are they doing this?  LINK

When I first started posting to blogs about medical cannabis or “repeal prohibition” it was 2003.  That was 15 years ago.  By the time I became affiliated with the USMjParty it was 2005 and 2010 before I really became involved in any administration of the group.  I always fought for the repeal of prohibition as a whole, but most importantly for Cannabis because yes, I believe Cannabis is a medicine, but first it has to be recognized as a food or ‘herb’ that cannot be controlled by the U.N. or any Government entity!  It is our unalienable right to grow and use the plants that our “Creator” put here on this planet for us! Only commerce can be controlled by our Government, according to the Constitution.  Therefore what we grow on our property or consume in our homes is actually none of the Government’s business!  But they MADE it their business – a long time ago. 

To understand how they accomplished this takeover, you can read the “Elkhorn Manifesto” through this link.  That was the beginning of the downfall of the United States as we see it today.  The U.N. which was formed in 1945 with five founding members including the United States was the beginning of the NWO as we know it today.  The ONDCP and the 1961 Narcotic Convention as well as the 1970 Controlled Substance Act and the DEA instituted by Nixon, as a requirement of the 1970 CSA, as per the U.N., conveniently wrapped up our lives under the control of the NWO.  I wrote about this a couple of years ago and it has a lot of interesting links of information it that article.

The U.N. just issued a statement reminding all signatory Countries to be mindful of their “Treaties” regarding Marijuana.

Be mindful of the fact that it is not just Marijuana that they seek to control.  Control the food and medicine and you will control the people.

We are just now seeing how one world Government will work.  It is reaching into all facets of our lives, some not noticeable yet to the average person, not just whether or not Marijuana is “legal”. 

All of these things together, coupled with the fact that our Legislature has their own agenda for Kentucky influences the outcome of any Cannabis legislation being passed here. 

We still have a couple weeks to see what the outcome will be for the Citizens of Kentucky.  Will the hard work by our dedicated Activists pay off for the Patients who are in such need in our State?  We can only continue to pray and also continue calling


and make sure your voice is heard!

As well, K.C.F.C. and others are gathering in Frankfort to show support.  You can follow them at this LINK.

There is a VERY good article documenting all of the Cannabis Bills in Kentucky this year at Kentucky Free Press.  If you haven’t already done so I encourage you to look at it.

Sally Oh,  who writes for Kentucky Free Press, was LIVE on Facebook on February 25th, explaining Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War  and I encourage you to view that video as well.

Sally Oh KY Free Press

Again, I want to thank everyone that has made an effort of any kind in Kentucky toward the repeal of Cannabis prohibition!  We all basically want the same thing – our patients to be taken care of and the freedom to possess, grow and consume a plant that our Creator blessed us with!

God Bless!


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Medical marijuana vote coming Tuesday



FRANKFORT — The state House Judiciary Committee plans a vote Tuesday on authorizing the use of medical marijuana for treatment of chronic pain, side effects of chemotherapy and conditions like multiple sclerosis.

The committee heard testimony Monday on House Bill 166, sponsored by Rep. John Sims, R-Flemingsburg, which would allow doctors to qualify patients as appropriate consumers of medical cannabis for a variety of ailments. His bill is the product of a task force convened by Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Sen. Stephen West, R-Paris, has filed a companion bill in the Senate — but the odds of passing either bill remain long in a conservative state and Republican majority legislature.

“This is not about marijuana,” Sims told the committee. “It’s about patients who have exhausted other remedies.”

Sims said 29 other states have legalized medical cannabis in some form which he said is effective in treatment of chronic pain, post traumatic stress, side effects of chemotherapy and other maladies.

Jaime Montalvo, a former emergency medical technician who has advocated for medical marijuana for several years, said the bill is based on what has worked best in some of the 29 states which already allow medical use of cannabis.

He cited multiple studies which also indicate an 11 percent decline in opioid prescriptions in those states and a 25 percent drop in the number of opioid overdoses.

The bill would allow doctors to qualify or certify patients to use the substance which would be grown, distributed and dispensed independently at each step in the process. By not prescribing or dispensing the drug, physicians won’t run afoul of federal prohibitions or endanger their licenses or certifications, Montalvo said.

A couple of years ago, the legislature authorized the use of CBD, an extract of marijuana and hemp which produces no psychotropic effect but has been found effective in reducing seizures. But the practical application of the law ran into road blocks because of federal laws and physicians and hospitals were hesitant to use the subject.

Montalvo said by having someone else dispense medical cannabis after a physician qualified a patient for its use would avoid that difficulty.

The legislation would allow local communities to “opt in,” Montalvo said, through a vote by the city or county legislative body. However, should those bodies vote not to allow the use of medical marijuana in their communities, citizens could petition for a referendum much as they can now for votes on alcohol sales.

Committee Chairman Rep. Joe Fischer, R-Ft. Thomas, said he plans a vote on the bill upon adjournment of the full House Tuesday.

The committee, however, approved one bill Monday and sent it to the full House: a measure to provide new Family Court Judges in the 28th Circuit which serves Lincoln, Pulaski and Rockcastle counties and the 54th which serves Boone and Kenton.

Supreme Court Justice John Minton last year asked lawmakers to redraw several circuits and districts because judges in some were handling far larger caseloads than some in other districts. The measure passed the Senate but stalled in the House — primarily because the bill re-allocated some existing judgeships from one area to another rather than creating new ones.

This year, Minton is asking that lawmakers at least address the two overworked circuits by creating the two new judgeships.

Then in 2022, a year in which all judges’ terms would expire before re-election, Minton said, an existing judgeship would be eliminated in Floyd County and another in western Kentucky by combining two districts. Those would offset the two new judgeships in the 28th and 54th circuits.

Judge Tom Smith, one of the Floyd County judges, testified in opposition to the measure, claiming the numbering system for cases is inconsistent and inaccurate and does not fairly reflect the actual case loads.

But the committee voted to send the bill to the full House.

The committee also heard graphic testimony by supporters and opponents of a bill sponsored by Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Burlington, which would outlaw a type of abortion after 11 weeks.

The committee plans to vote on that bill when it meets again on Tuesday as well.



Sally Oh was Live on Facebook: “Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War”


Sally Oh

Above is the LINK to Sally Oh’s live video on Facebook explaining States Rights and the medical cannabis war.

There is also an article at this LINK from the Tenth Amendment Center which explains States Rights.

States Don’t Have to Comply: The Anti-Commandeering Doctrine

Laws passed in pursuance of the Constitution do stand as the supreme law of the land. But that doesn’t in any way imply the federal government lords over everything and everybody in America. LINK



There is also a very good layout of the Kentucky Cannabis Bills for 2018 at the KENTUCKY FREE PRESS website.  Here is that LINK.



(Louisville, KY) Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form


The following comment form is being circulated to give the Citizens of the Louisville Metro area of Kentucky a chance to voice their opinions concerning the ongoing medical marijuana discussions in the Legislature.

Please take a moment if you live in this area to fill out the form and let them hear your feelings on this subject.

Thank You!

Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form

Louisville Metro Council’s Health and Education Committee Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form. The Louisville Metro Council values your input on a resolution under consideration regarding the legalization of Medical Marijuana.



KY Cannabis Freedom Coalition Requests Your Help!



Call NOW 1-800-372-7181


AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis.
     Establish and create new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to define terms, allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis;  LINK


Kentucky: Marijuana Legalization Bill to be Introduced For 2018


Republican state Senator Dan Seum plans on introducing legislation for the 2018 session that legalizes the adult use of and sale of cannabis.

Lawmakers in the 2018 legislative session will be primarily focused on crafting and passing a two-year state budget bill. The Senator believes that casting adult use legalization as a “jobs bill” will gain in traction.

“I’m looking at adult use, because that’s where the money is at,” Seum said.

According to the DEA, agents confiscated over 300,000 marijuana plants in Kentucky in 2016 — the third highest total of any state in the nation.

Enter your information below to send a letter to your state elected officials in support of this effort.



Jellystone Park at Mammoth Cave wins national award


Jellystone Park

Bill and Kay Pott, owners of Jellystone Park at Mammoth Cave off Mammoth Cave Road, recently received the Dan O’Connell Service Award from Leisure Systems Inc., the Milford, Ohio-based company that franchises 80 Jellystone Parks across the U.S. and Canada. The award is presented to Jellystone Park owners who make extreme efforts to expand the campground industry.

CAVE CITY — The owners of a Cave City campground have been recognized nationally for expanding their business.

Bill and Kay Pott, owners of the Jellystone Park at Mammoth Cave off Mammoth Cave Road, recently received the Dan O’Connell Service Award from Leisure Systems Inc., the Milford, Ohio-based company that franchises 80 Jellystone Parks across the U.S. and Canada.

The award is presented to Jellystone Park owners who make extreme efforts to expand the campground industry.

The Potts are undertaking a $10.7 million expansion project at their campground, which includes the construction of a 2.3 acre splash beach alongside a manmade pond, which will include 110 by 130 foot long modular sports park called a Wibit.

The award was announced during the company’s annual symposium in November. The Potts attended the event, but had to leave early in order to take advantage of a two-day window of dry weather so that the liner for the 2.3 acre pond could be installed.

“We were totally surprised,” Pott said. “I wish we had been at the banquet. In 14 years, we have missed the banquet twice and … both times we won a significant award.”

In addition to the 2.3-acre splash beach, the expansion project includes a 110 by 130 foot long modular sports park that floats on the water called a Wibit, two additional water feature ponds, five additional playground areas, five additional bathhouses, a pedal cart track and day-use pet kennels.

Pott is hoping to have everything wrapped for the first phase of the project by late spring.

“By the end of March, we expect all the sites to be done, the playgrounds to be done and the bathhouses to be done. The grass will be planted, but I doubt it will be up by that point,” he said.

The expansion project also includes a larger Ranger Station, which features a snack bar and a gift shop.

On Tuesday, Pott said he anticipates the water and sewer to be connected for the Ranger Station by next week.

As for the splash beach, the liner is in. The sand is probably about 70 percent complete and they are starting to fill up the pond, he said.

“And we are finalizing the order on the Wibit,” Pott said.

The Wibit won’t be opened to the public until Memorial Day weekend. The beach will be open by spring break, he said.

The Potts chose to expand their park in Cave City due to being at capacity a majority of the time.

“We have been full on weekends for spring break, all summer and Halloween and starting to be on full during the middle of the week for several years now and then we finally had a chance to get some additional land we jumped on it,” he said. “Really, when you are full and you’ve got waiting lists, you need to expand. And we finally had the opportunity.”

The Potts weren’t expecting to win the award.

“We weren’t expecting any kind of award this year, so it was very, very good,” he said.

On Dec. 12, the Cave City Chamber of Commerce presented the Potts with the Economic Development Award. To have that honor follow the receipt of the Dan O’Connell Service Award was “just icing on the cake.”

“We feel very blessed to receive these recognitions,” he said.

Pott stated in a press release from Leisure Systems Inc. that the expansion project will have a positive effect on the Cave City economy by producing short-term construction jobs and a permanent increase in Jellystone Park’s workforce from 55 to 81 full and part-time employees during the peak summer camping seasons.

The park has received national attention in the past. It was named by U.S. News and World Report as one of “The Eight Coolest Campgrounds for Families” in 2016, while the Travel Channel named it one of the 10 best campgrounds for families in 2015, the press release said.

The park was also named the “Facility of the Year” in 2015 by Leisure Systems Inc. for its efforts to make sustained improvements.

For more information about the park, go to



“We strongly urge the Department of Veteran Affairs and Kentucky Assembly to actively support passage of a strong comprehensive medical cannabis bill as soon as possible…”

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Thomas Tony Vance added 2 new photos.

8 mins ·

On this Veterans Day

I would like to strongly urge the both the Veterans Administration and the Kentucky State Assembly, that with an estimated 750,000 cases of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, among the Veteran population, they should seriously consider Veteran access to cannabis.

Veteran’s organizations are recognizing the effectiveness of cannabis in treating this condition. The American Legion has two resolutions favoring Veteran access to medical cannabis.

A worrisome component of Veteran Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with chronic pain is the constant, ever hovering specter of addiction and suicide among the Veteran population. The suicide rate sometimes reported to be as much as 22 a day, may seem a high estimate but a suicide day is 30 a month and one a day too much.

When considering the high rates of drug addiction and suicide among the Veteran population one must also consider the following reports. A recent Journal of the American Medical Association report of a 25% drop in opioid overdose deaths in states with medical marijuana laws and a Cato Institute report from January of 2015 citing a 5% drop in suicides in states having medical marijuana laws. We would expect to see a similar drop in Veteran addiction overdose deaths and suicides should Congress or the Kentucky Assembly pass a Medical cannabis law. Veterans have long recognized the beneficial effects of medical cannabis and Veterans in medical cannabis states report great success when using medical cannabis for PTSD, chronic pain and a number of other conditions for which cannabis is effective.

We strongly urge the Department of Veteran Affairs and Kentucky Assembly to actively support passage of a strong comprehensive medical cannabis bill as soon as possible. The welfare of our Veterans, indeed, their lives are depending on it!



Fresh crop: Wilson among Kentucky’s new hemp farmers

Chad WilsonChad Wilson of Cave City stands next a row of industrial hemp he is growing on his farm called the Sacred Seed Farm. He is growing hemp for the cannabidiol or CDB, which is extracted from the plant and can be used to treat certain illnesses. Gina Kinslow / Glasgow Daily Times


CAVE CITY – Seven years ago, Chad Wilson was anti-industrial hemp, but that’s mostly because he didn’t really know what it was. He thought industrial hemp and marijuana were the same thing.

But they’re not. Industrial hemp is different from marijuana, even though they are part of the same plant family.

“All my life I was told to stay away from the Devil’s lettuce, and that’s what I did as a good southern boy,” he said. “I didn’t understand that hemp wasn’t marijuana.”

The major difference between the two is that industrial hemp contains a much lower concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, than marijuana.

THC is the hallucinogenic that is found in marijuana.

“There is no getting high off industrial hemp,” he said.

After seven years, Wilson has come a long way. He has gone from being anti-industrial hemp to being an industrial hemp farmer. He is also now a cannabis activist.

He grows hemp on land in Cave City he calls the Sacred Seed Farm, and says he got into industrial hemp farming by accident.

“I was doing organic farming on a little two acre plot in Bowling Green. I realized my son did not know how to grow his own food and seeds. At that point I was just doing traditional gardening, so I got into finding ways to teach him and stumbled across some stuff on hemp and the nutritional value,” he said.

Then he discovered that studies are showing an extract of industrial hemp can be used to aid in the treatment of certain illnesses, even epilepsy. He also learned that industrial hemp can be used to make biodiesel fuel and clothing, among other things.

Wilson planted a little more than nine acres of industrial hemp this year. He is one of two hemp farmers in Barren County, and one of many across the state.

“In order to be a hemp producer, it is a permitting process and that process is handled by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture in cooperation with law enforcement so that everybody is on the same page. They know where every hemp production is,” said Chris Schalk, Barren County’s Agriculture Extension Agent. “I guess this is probably the second or third year for the permitting process.”

The federal farm bill of 2014 allowed state departments of agriculture to create industrial hemp research pilot programs.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles hosted a roundtable discussion for Barren County producers in October at the Barren County Cooperative Extension Service’s office off West Main Street, and during his talk he mentioned industrial hemp.

“Industrial hemp obviously gets a lot of publicity. We have a very strong industrial research hemp program here. We want to remind people that this may not be a silver bullet for tobacco, but it might be something that works for some farmers. It may not work for others,” he said. “My family used to grow it in World War II because the government asked them to for the U.S. Navy. For some people we believe this could be a profitable market.”

On Wilson’s Sacred Seed Farm, he grows industrial hemp for the cannabidiol or CDB, a natural plant compound with significant medical benefits.

Wilson is co-owner of a Louisville-based business called Green Remedy.

“We buy the hemp from the farmers and then we take it into our facility and we have a CO2 extraction where we extract the CDB and then we make the tinctures and the capsules and the isolets and all the different kinds of products, and it is a Kentucky Proud Product,” he said.

Wilson is also owner of another business called Modern Concepts, which is located on the Sacred Seed Farm in Cave City.

“This is about a 4-year-old business that I moved from Bowling Green because I wanted to get back to small town America. I wanted to get back to country living and back home to the country,” Wilson said. “We’re losing farm families every day across the state and my family was one of the ones who lost their farm in the early ’80s due to the economics of farming. For me, it’s personal and it’s about getting my boys back to the farm and living simpler.”

Modern Concepts is a garden supply center that will offer organic, hydroponic, aquaponic and aeroponicly grown plants.

“We’re also a distributor for a “Shark Tank’ product – the Tree-T-Pee. What we’re doing is basically going out and finding the specialty product for this industry and bringing it to Cave City,” he said.

Industrial hemp farming has become an economically viable business for many producers.

“There’s not a lot crops out there right now that can bring the economic hope to the small Kentucky farm like this plant can right now,” Wilson said.

Despite all the things industrial hemp has going for it, it is considered to be a Schedule I controlled substance under the federal Controlled Substances Act, along with other varieties of cannabis. But that is something U.S. Rep. James Comer, R-Tompkinsville, is hoping to change.

“I have a bill that I’m working on … that will address all of the updates that are needed with the hemp industry. And that’s the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2017,” Comer said.

The Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2017 will do a lot of things, but the main thing it will do is reclassify industrial hemp from a controlled substance to an agriculture crop.

“That will solve a lot of the problems right there,” he said.

Comer, a former Kentucky commissioner of agriculture, referred to industrial hemp as being “a huge success story.”

“That’s something I was glad to be a part of in a big way and that’s kind of the issue that I’m identified with. When we passed it in 2013 in Kentucky, nobody would have predicted that here we are four years later and we are the leading hemp producing state in the nation,” he said. “It’s just been a real good success story. There’s a lot of hemp being grown in Kentucky. A lot of companies that are coming into the state are making a big private investment, so I think the future looks very bright for the hemp industry in Kentucky.”

Extracting CDB from industrial hemp is not the only thing that can be done with the plant.

“It is being used as fiber in textiles. It is being used as a heavy duty fiber in a lot of the tarps that is used in the military. We’ve got companies trying to use the fiber to make components for the automotive industry for mainly the dashboards and door panels for cars in Europe,” Comer said

Industrial hemp is also being grown for livestock feed.

“Murray State University is doing a lot of research on hemp from that aspect because it yields so much more per acre than fescue hay,” he said. “And they are testing the digestibility and the nutrient content. Cattle eat it. That’s for sure.”

Comer continued that he thinks more and more uses will surface for industrial hemp because it is a plant than can be used in so many ways.

“It can be used in bioenergy. It can be used in textiles. It can be used in pharmaceuticals. It can be used in construction. There seems like for every potential use of hemp there is interest in companies to come into the state and make an investment and start processing the hemp here in Kentucky, which would be good,” he said. “It would be good for farmers. It would be good for job creation.

“I think that once we can get legislation on the federal level that deregulates hemp, I think you’ll see more private dollars flow in and more processing facilities come online and therefore more farmers will grow it.”