Apathy could end some cave city Kentucky events


Cave City Proud Days 2014

 

By GINA KINSLOW gkinslow@glasgowdailytimes.com 9 hrs ago

CAVE CITY — Fewer than 10 people attended what was supposed to be a town hall meeting Thursday night at city hall in Cave City.

The purpose of the meeting was to discuss upcoming events, including a summer concert series and the Proud Days Festival, but what those who turned out for the meeting ended up talking about was growing apathy among townspeople, the Cave City Chamber of Commerce and the Cave City Convention Center.

Over time, fewer and fewer people volunteer to help with events, and those who have been involved say they need more assistance.

“I don’t understand how or why they expect us to do everything,” said Robert Smith, city code enforcement officer.

Smith continued he would like to see more Cave City citizens, as well as members of the local chamber of commerce and others get involved and help with events, because if they don’t, the events may have to be canceled.

Mayor Dwayne Hatcher agreed with Smith and said, “Everything you said is true.”

“The apathy is just getting worse and worse,” said Cave City councilman Seaborn Ellzey.

The group discussed making some changes, such as the location of the summer concert series. Instead of holding it downtown, there was discussion of it taking place closer to hotels so tourists can walk to the concerts, or possibly having a concert at the ballpark off Mammoth Cave Street.

After meeting for 30 minutes, the group decided to meet again in two weeks at 6 p.m. on March 31 to provide a chance for more people to attend and get involved in making plans for upcoming events.

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Following a unanimous vote Monday night by City Council members, Cave City accepted a land donation of 40 acres, located beside the Cave City Convention Center


 

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On December 16th, it was announced via WBKO Television News that the Gaunce family had donated a piece of land adjacent to the Cave City Convention Center, to be used for an Industrial Park for the City.

The land was valued at $650,000, a price Smith said the city never would have been able to afford on their own.

Cave City did purchase a small section of land that joined the portion the Gaunce family gave them in hopes of building a nice  entrance to the industrial park, as well as fulfilling some requirements set by the State Highway Department.

Robert Smith stated in that article that, “Cave City has always been known as a tourist town and up until this point that’s been really good for us; however, tourism industry has changed. We need an everyday tax base for us, we need jobs that people can go to without having to travel so far,”

I would beg to differ with that argument because everywhere I look I see “help wanted” signs around the area.  There seems to be plenty of employment opportunities available for that type of work.  They do seem to be having a hard time filling those positions judging from the signs and advertisements that are all over the road and in the media as well.  One of the reasons for that is that every job is requiring a “drug test” be submitted before employment which, we all know, is biased against anyone who smokes Cannabis for any reason.

So why do we need an Industrial Park sitting in the main area which is the “entrance” to the town of “Cave City”?  A place which has always been a tourist town and the place to go to see small town life and Nature as well?  A place that can’t fill all of the industrial type of jobs that it currently has, let alone more?  Doe’s anyone living in the Cave City area see a reason to build this Industrial Park for more jobs?  We need small shop owners and café’s to reopen in the area, as well as some types of agribusinesses, not factories or other monstrous businesses. 

Per the report,  in a unanimous vote on December 14th, by the City Council members, Cave City chose to accept a land donation of 40 acres, located beside the Cave City Convention Center.  This gift was donated by the Gaunce family, who, incidentally , SOLD Cave City a small parcel of land adjacent to this property to be used for the “Entrance”.

The City Council includes the following six members, according to the Cave City official website: Gary Hogan, Seaborn Ellzey, Gary Minor, Kevin Houchens, Denny Doyle and
Steve Pedigo.  The Cave City Council Meeting is the second Monday of the Month, so the next meeting will be January 11th, 2016*. 

The Glasgow Times reported that the property is actually owned by Wayne Gaunce, according to his son, Patrick. 

“I guess if anything that should be said it should be that Cave City has been good to our family, and this is a small way that we can be good to Cave City,” said Patrick Gaunce.

Additionally in the Glasgow Times,  Mayor Dwayne Hatcher said, “The main purpose I feel of government is to provide for the needs of the citizens,” said Mayor Dwayne Hatcher. “I feel like we have done that. Have we done everything that needs to be done?  No, but I think we have made progress and will continue to do so.”

According to the same article in the Glasgow Times, in February, the city received a $100,000 grant from the Industrial Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County to use for the purpose of acquiring property and developing it into an industrial park.

Why couldn’t the Gaunce family donate this land to Cave City ‘just because’?  In other words, why must it be used for an Industrial Park in the middle of a Tourist town?  Why does everything have to ‘progress’ to industrial?  How about we use the donated land and grant money to plant and promote ‘industrial Hemp farming’ on that property?  And the unoccupied property at the corner of 101 Broadway can be turned into a ‘Cannabis Café’ and by Spring of 2017 we will have a boom town in Kentucky with plenty of jobs for all of the people…even the ones that occasionally smoke Marijuana!

Coming from a large city I have seen first hand the damage an industrialized zone does to residential areas.  It is not a pretty site to see.   The pollution is not wanted or needed here, (we get enough of Louisville’s already),  and even if the ‘business’ produces little to even no pollution of it’s own (which is doubtful), the extra exhaust from the traffic will be noticeable to say the least.  We need to protect the environment, the agricultural heritage and the people of Cave City. 

Put some cow’s and Hemp on that land…. and keep the Industry out!

Also of note,

Posted: Friday, February 13, 2015 11:52 pm

By JAMES BROWN / Glasgow Daily Times

The IDEA board entered closed session to discuss property. The Infrastructure Committee of the Glasgow-Barren County Chamber of Commerce has identified property that could be developed for industrial needs. The committee members were on hand to give a presentation of those properties in closed session. LINK

 

 

*Anyone interested in attending the Cave City Council Meeting on January 11th, 2016 please email me at shereekrider@usmjparty.com or contact me thru Facebook at THIS LINK.

 

 

Information obtained from these links:

A year to remember for Cave City

Donation sets Cave City on track for new Industrial Park

Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County

Glasgow/Barren Co. IDEA

Incentive Programs

Floyd Collins, Wayne Gaunce are inducted into Hall of Fame

Gaunce Management Inc.

Houchens Industries Inc.

Barren County Property Valuation Administrator

Cave City receives $100K grant

Hunters Killed 20 Bears in Kentucky During Season


 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — State Fish and Wildlife officials say hunters in Kentucky claimed 20 black bears during the season that ended in December.

It was the first season with a new expanded bear hunting zone and an archery and crossbow season.

Hunters can now hunt bears in 16 Kentucky counties, up from four counties in 2012.

In the recent season, hunters harvested eight male and two female bears during the firearms season. They took six males and four females during the archery and crossbow season.

Seven were killed in Letcher County, and three bears each were taken in Harlan, Leslie and Perry counties.

Modern-day bear hunting in Kentucky began in 2009.

CONTINUE READING HERE:

…the indiscriminate and immediate disposal of national public lands…


In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, rancher Cliven Bundy stands along the road near his ranch in Bunkerville, Nev.

 

The Republican platform committee met this week to draft the document that defines the party’s official principles and policies. Along with provisions on pornography and LGBT “conversion therapy” is an amendment calling for the indiscriminate and immediate disposal of national public lands.

The inclusion of this provision in the Republican Party’s platform reflects the growing influence of and ideological alliance between several anti-park members of the GOP and anti-government extremists, led by Cliven Bundy, who dispute the federal government’s authority over national public lands.

“Congress shall immediately pass universal legislation providing a timely and orderly mechanism requiring the federal government to convey certain federally controlled public lands to the states,” reads the adopted language. “We call upon all national and state leaders and representatives to exert their utmost power and influence to urge the transfer of those lands identified.”

The provision calls for an immediate full-scale disposal of “certain” public lands, without defining which lands it would apply to, leaving national parks, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, and national forests apparently up for grabs and vulnerable to development, privatization, or transfer to state ownership.

The Koch Brothers Are Now Funding The Bundy Land Seizure Agenda

“That’s a very broad brush to basically say we’re going to turn over all federal lands to states; some states don’t have the resources to handle it,” said West Virginia state Senator and committee delegate Vic Sprouse, who was pushing for a similar provision, but with milder language. He said this more extreme language would instead “willy-nilly” turn over federal property without regard to the type of land or willingness of the state to manage it.

Though public land disposal language was also present in the GOP’s 2012 platform, the position takes on new meaning in the wake of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge takeover earlier this year. The now-indicted leaders of the takeover, Ammon and Ryan Bundy, and other extremists present at the refuge similarly demanded that the U.S. government give up authority over national public lands in the West.

“I have long believed that public lands are an equalizer in America, where access to public lands ensures that you don’t need to be a millionaire to enjoy the great outdoors or to introduce your children to hunting, fishing and hiking,” said Senator Martin Heinrich during a recent floor speech on ALEC-funded land seizure legislation. “This land grab idea is just as ludicrous as denying climate change, just as detached from reality, and similarly comes at the expense of our public health and protection of our public lands and resources.”

Congressional Proposal Would Create A Texas-Sized ‘Republic Of Cliven Bundy’

Disposal of national parks, wilderness, forests, and other public lands is not the only way the GOP platform addresses conservation issues. Delegates also approved an amendment aimed at curbing the Antiquities Act of 1906, a law which has protected national monuments ranging from the Statue of Liberty to the Grand Canyon. The amendment requires “the approval of the state where the national monument is designated or a national park is proposed,” which would severely limit the President’s ability to protect at-risk places.

The delegates also passed language specifying that the Republican Party believes that the sage grouse, prairie chicken, and the gray wolf should be exempt from the protections of the Endangered Species Act. This not only gets into the weeds of local issues, but cuts corners in scientific species and conservation management regulations.

Party delegates will vote to adopt the draft document at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week.

Jenny Rowland is the Research and Advocacy Associate for the Public Lands Project at Center for American Progress. Follow her on Twitter @jennyhrowland.

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Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes


Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes – LINK

PLEASE FOLLOW LINK ABOVE TO COMPLETE THIS IMPORTANT SURVEY!  YOUR HEALTHCARE IS AT RISK IN KENTUCKY!  NOW IS THE TIME TO SPEAK UP!

 


 

United 874K Members and Supporters –
The three public hearings on the proposed Medicaid waiver have been completed, with approximately 400 individuals in attendance in Bowling Green, Frankfort and Hazard, KY and nearly 100 individuals who spoke. 98% of those who spoke expressed concerns about the proposed waiver. Concerns were expressed about requiring the “medically frail” to pay monthly premiums; about a work or volunteer requirement of 20 hours/week for those on the Medicaid Expansion; loss of retroactive eligibility which could cause a lapse in coverage or a delay in beginning Medicaid coverage; increasing premiums over several years for some Medicaid members, with a 6-month lock-out from services if the premium is not paid; eliminating annual dental and vision check-ups and routine care for the Medicaid Expansion folks
Clearly those Medicaid members who are deemed to be “medically frail” (by a process yet to be determined, but ostensibly those with SMI. Chronic SUD, complicated medical conditions, are on SSI, or have a disability that interferes with a task of daily living) will be charged a monthly premium, probably in the range of $1 – $8 / month. We are concerned both by the financial burden, but also by the administrative burden created by this requirement. If the premium is not paid, then the medically frail individual will have to pay a copay for every service and every medication! While the 1915 C Waivers are exempt from this current 1115 Waiver Proposal from the Administration, we are concerned about individuals who are currently covered by Medicaid while waiting for a 1915 waiver slot. They would likely be classified as “medically frail” and would be subject to a monthly premium; if not paid, then they would be charged a copay for each health service and each medication they receive.
Medically frail individuals will not have a work or volunteer requirement and will have the full range of current benefits, including dental and vision. These latter benefits (annual check-up, routine cleanings, etc.) are being removed from the benefit package for all other Medicaid members (excluding children and pregnant women); those basic health benefits will have to be “earned” by the member through their Rewards Account.
I urge you to spread the word and to encourage those affected by these waiver changes, their families, providers and advocates to submit comments! I am available to answer questions or to be of assistance, if you will contact me.
I have attached a flyer which gives information about writing or emailing your comments about the waiver to Medicaid Commissioner Miller. THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF WRITTEN COMMENTS IS 5:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, JULY 22, 2016! Volume is important, so please encourage everyone to write in. And send a copy of your comment to kymedicaidchanges@gmail.com so we can be sure that your voice is heard!
I have also attached a brief description of the waiver proposal and how it would affect various groups of people who are now Medicaid members.
KY Voices for Health is conducting a very short SURVEY about the proposed changes in Medicaid. Please distribute this link and ask folks to complete the survey! It takes less than 3-4 minutes.

(WTF? You can’t make this stuff up!) Cocaine Bear Attracts Visitors To Lexington Business


                                                               (PLEASE CLICK THE LINK ABOVE TO SEE THE VIDEO!)

 

LEXINGTON, Ky (LEX 18) Lately we’ve been reporting about black bear sightings around the Commonwealth, but you can see the bear tied to one of Kentucky’s greatest conspiracies on display right here in Lexington.

Cocaine Bear spent years on the road but now he’s mounted on the back of a pick-up truck in Kentucky for Kentucky’s Fun Mall.

Whit Hyler, the co-owner of Kentucky for Kentucky, says that they only had to pay for shipping to get the bear to Kentucky from the Nevada Desert.

People are coming from all over the world to see the famous Cocaine Bear.

The bear’s story dates back to 1985, when Andrew Thornton, a true Kentucky Blue Blood, turned drug smuggler parachuted to his death over Tennessee with cocaine strapped to his body.

A black bear ate 75 pounds worth of cocaine that Thornton dropped in Georgia’s Chattahoochee Forest.

The bear overdosed and died from the estimated $15 million worth of cocaine.

The Cocaine Bear was stuffed and sold to the great Waylon Jennings, who didn’t even know the Cocaine Bear’s story; he was just a collector of such items.

Jennings sent the bear as a gift to his friend in Nevada. When that friend died, “Pablo EskoBear,” as he is now known, was then sold to a pawn shop.

Hyler located the bear and the pawn shop gave it to him.

“They just wanted to get rid of it. They were over it,” said Hyler.

He paid for the shipping, and now the bear that plays an important role in the book, ‘The Bluegrass Conspiracy’ is on Bryan Avenue.

Hyler says that Thorton’s story took play in and around Lexington.

Kentucky for Kentucky is working on giving Pablo EskoBear his own section where there will be Cocaine Bear gear.

You can see the Cocaine Bear at the Kentucky for Kentucky Fun Mall from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday-Friday. 

CONTINUE READING (YOU GOT TO SEE THE VIDEO!)

Genius Extraction Technologies, a California company the produces hemp and cannabis oil extraction equipment, announced plans to build a new $400,000 hemp processing facility in Winchester


 

 

The Sunday Drive: Kentucky, others getting on board with hemp

Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016 11:37 am

By Steve Foley The Winchester Sun | 1 comment

Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act established in 2014 is quickly making it’s presence felt here in the Bluegrass.

That, my friends, is a good thing.

The Agricultural Act of 2014 allowed certain states including Kentucky to start farming hemp again after a ban of almost 60 years. 

While it will probably take a few years before we fully know if hemp can replace a significant portion of the income lost with the disappearance of tobacco and coal revenue, there’s a plethora of Kentuckian entrepreneurs, farmers and manufacturers who already are staking their future on it.

The hemp revitalization began soon after Feb. 7, 2014, when the Agricultural Act bill was signed into law. It authorized five-year pilot programs throughout universities and state departments of agriculture. 

As of today, there are 28 states including many in the South which have been approved to grow industrial hemp — some for research and some for commercial value. For the next four years, hemp can be grown and processed to produce fiber for textiles, paper and building materials, as well as seed and oil for food, beauty products, biopharmaceuticals and fuel.

It’s been well advertised Kentucky is the epicenter for hemp, as U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer have made the state a leader in industrial hemp production.,

Now, farmers across the state including many former tobacco farmers are planting hemp seeds that have been grown in the country since the crop was banned nearly 60 years ago.

Last year, the Kentucky State Department of Agriculture  licensed more than 100 programs at universities, private farms and processing sites. One of them is here in Clark County located off Colby Road at Atalo Holdings, Inc, a 27-acre farm of cannabinoid-rich plants.

Last month, Genius Extraction Technologies, a California company the produces hemp and cannabis oil extraction equipment, announced plans to build a new $400,000 hemp processing facility in Winchester.

The facility will be located at Atalo’s Hemp Research Campus on Colby Road, where early testing and setup has been underway since March.

The company expects to process some 250,000 pounds of hemp for commercial uses in the fall for Atalo and its subsidiaries, Super Food Processing and KentuckyCBD.

Across the state, hemp pilot programs have dramatically increased over the past year with hundreds participating and close to 4,500 acres of hemp being planted.

According to a recent report from SurfKY News, Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy Executive Director Warren Beeler told the Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee Atalo Holdings’ hemp contracts this year cover over half of the 4,500 acres planted statewide.

Atalo got its start with $492,000 in state funds pulled from a 16-year-old settlement between the state and cigarette manufacturers after Kentucky made state-sponsored research legal in 2013, Beeler said.

It was the first project to receive state tobacco settlement dollars for a hemp-related project, the GOAP reported last year, and it is currently processing its product from last year into protein powder and other legal hemp products.

Many other hemp operations are also at work across the state, and most hemp grown are being used for cannabidiol or CBD, a lucrative hemp compound believed to have medicinal benefits.

Kentucky passed a law in 2014 that excludes CBD oil from the definition of marijuana for certain epileptic patients.

CBD oil is just one product in today’s ever increasing hemp market. How large the hemp market will grown remains to be seen.

“How big is the market? We don’t know that,” Beeler said in the same SurfKY News story, telling the Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee he hopes hemp production can eventually replace lost tobacco income. “We went from 33 acres (or industrial hemp initially) to somewhere in the neighborhood of 4,000 to 5,000 this year, and I don’t think anybody much is raising this stuff who doesn’t have a contract or place to get rid of it.

“Who knows where we might be in 20 years?”

Contact Steve Foley at steve.foley@winchestersun.com or follow him on Twitter @SteveFoley8.

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Gotta catch ’em all: Glasgow kids, adults play Pokemon Go


  • WILL PERKINS wperkins@glasgowdailytimes.com
  •  

    Shanna Estes

    GLASGOW – Drivers may have noticed a recent rise in foot traffic around the public square. Kids and adults can be seen looking around, swiping their fingers across their smartphones.

    A week ago, they might have been texting or taking selfies, but now they are probably playing Pokemon Go.

    Ever since its release on July 6, the app “Pokemon Go” has caused kids and adults across the country to leave the comfort of their homes and get out into their communities.

    “The whole thing is trying to get kids and young adults out and walking around and not just sitting in the house playing on video game consoles,” said Caleb Hicks, who was walking around the square Monday morning playing Pokemon Go on his phone.

    Hicks, 27, said he downloaded the app on Thursday, and he plays when he is not at work.

    “I play it off and on, you know, pretty much when I’m moving around,” he said. “That’s when I play it ’cause it’s not a real like ‘sit still and play game.’”

    In the game, players control Pokemon trainers who have the ability to catch Pokemon, fictional creatures that the players can collect, level-up and use to battle other trainers.

    The app uses GPS to pinpoint a player’s location as well as the location of the Pokemon that are randomly populated into the environment.

    When a player locates a Pokemon, the app uses the device’s camera to display what is in front of the player and then imposes the image of the Pokemon, so it looks as though the Pokemon is actually moving around in the real world as a player attempts to capture it.

    Pokemon Go uses actual landmarks, like the Plaza Theatre, as destinations in the game called gyms and Pokestops.

    “The Pokestops just give you extra Pokeballs to use to catch Pokemon,” Hicks said.

    Players can join one of three teams (red, blue or yellow), and teams can control the gyms.

    Hicks stood across from the Plaza Theatre, a gym in the game, and was able to gain control of it after several minutes of playing.

    He said the public square is the biggest concentration of Pokestops and gyms in Glasgow, “so that’s where most of the people gather.”

    “Yesterday, there were, you know, probably kids from 16 on up to adults with children of their own saying, ‘Daddy, let me play. Let me play,’” Hicks said. “It was amazing the spectrum of people that it caught. It wasn’t just teenagers and nostalgic young adults but it’s got adults in their 30s coming out here walking around because their kids wanna’ play.”

    Shanna Estes, 16, walked around the square Monday morning and she was playing Pokemon Go on her phone.

    “I play it periodically,” she said. “About a few times a week as long as I find some (Pokemon) nearby.

    “I think it’s fun, just walking around and searching for the Pokemon.”

    Estes said she likes to play Pokemon Go around the public square because it is easy to walk around, and there are usually other people playing.

    “It’s pretty fun to meet new people,” she said.

    Tyler Thomerson, 18, has been playing the game for two days and he said he likes reading about the historical landmarks when he passes them.

    “You’re learning history walking around playing Pokemon Go and you’re getting a workout while you’re doing it, too,” he said.

    Hicks said he thinks Pokemon Go is “gonna’ be a good thing and a bad thing,” adding that he thinks people might not pay attention to the traffic, especially younger players.

    “So that’s my only concern really with it,” he said. “Some kid’s gonna’ be trying to catch a Pokemon while crossing the street and get hit. Most of the adults, they take care of themselves, they know ‘hey, I need to make sure when I cross the street I’m not gonna’ get ran over.’”

    Thomerson said that there were about 50 people playing the game on the square Sunday night.

    “In a sense, you’re still playing a game,” he said. “But you’re still getting out and walking and having a good time with your friends.”

    There are 151 Pokemon in the game for players to capture.

    Gotta catch ’em all.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Lawmakers discuss pros and cons of medical marijuana


     

     

     

    FRANKFORT – A state legislative committee met today to discuss liberalizing marijuana laws for medical purposes.

    “We have been literally overwhelmed with correspondence and people wanting to testify before this committee today,” said Sen. John Schickel, R-Union, who chaired the meeting of the Interim Joint Committee on Licensing and Occupations.

    He said he asked that the subject of medical marijuana be placed on the agenda after several bills concerning marijuana were assigned to the Senate Standing Committee on Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations during the final weeks of the 2016 General Assembly.

    “At that time I made a commitment to the people both supporting and opposed to the legislation that we would have extensive hearings during the interim to learn more,” Schickel said. “It is really relevant legislation for our times. We have states all around us that are dealing with it also.”

    Sen. Perry B. Clark, D-Louisville, testified about last session’s Senate Bill 263, which would have legalized medical cannabis.

    “Where they’ve passed medical cannabis laws none of the cataclysmic predictions have materialized in any form,” he said.

    Clark was followed by testimony from Sen. Morgan McGarvey, D-Louisville, who introduced Senate Bill 304 last session. SB 304 sought to legalize medical marijuana for palliative or hospice care.

    “If you have eight months to live and something makes you comfortable … why wouldn’t we allow it?” he said. “We prescribe morphine and fentanyl to these same patients – literally drugs that are killing people in Kentucky.”

    Dr. Gregory Barnes of the University of Louisville testified about his research into the effectiveness of cannabidiol, known as CBD, in epilepsy.

    “It might not only represent a compound that is anti-seizer in character but also a compound that improves behaviors and cognition,” said Barnes. “I think that is a very important point for the committee to understand.”

    Jaime Montalvo, founder of Kentuckians for Medical Marijuana, spoke about using cannabis to treat his multiple sclerosis.

    “We believe conservatively that this can help over 100,000 Kentucky patients,” he said. “It would create economic growth, and it would potentially get rid of the black market we have today.”

    Dr. Danesh Mazloomdoost, a Lexington pain management specialist, cautioned legislators about the dangers of hastily passing medical marijuana legislation.

    “We can sensationalize the failures of conventional medicines as a rationale for legalization,” he said, adding marijuana isn’t a fix for these failures.

    He said while some, like Montalvo, might find relief from marijuana their stories are not representative of the average medical marijuana recipient.

    Kentucky Narcotic Officers’ Association (KNOA) President Micky Hatmaker said 25 other states have expanded access to cannabis for medical purposes either by ballot referendum or legislative intent.

    “That is contrary to the process by which all other drugs have been tested and approved,” he said. “All drugs intended for human consumption are required to have been tested and approved by the Food and Drug Administration.”

    Hatmaker said the concept of cannabis as medicine began in California in 1996 when they allowed access to cannabis, either smoked or ingested, to treat terminally ill patients and those who suffered from debilitating diseases.

    “In spite of the best intentions of these 25 states, raw marijuana either smoked or ingested is not medicine and has never been passed through the rigorous DA approval process to ensure the health and safety of patients,” he said. “The KNOA believes that medications, including marijuana-based drugs, should go through the scientific process, and should be accessed through legitimate physicians.”

    — END —

    "Cannabis is medicine," Clark said.


    mmjky16

     

    Even though the next session of the Kentucky legislature is months away, debate on whether to legalize medical marijuana is already underway.

    Legislators heard Friday from the law enforcement community and physicians.

    State Sen. Perry Clark, whose proposal last year never got out of committee, has promised to keep introducing medical marijuana legislation until his fellow lawmakers see the light.

    But he has plenty of hurdles to jump before that happens.

    “Cannabis is medicine,” Clark said.

    Medical marijuana is legal in 25 states, and Clark wants Kentucky to be next. He argues that no one has ever died from cannabis. Clark contends that misconceptions and false information are being disseminated by opponents.

    “In general say their biggest concern increase cannabis use among teens. There is mountains of evidence that this is not going on,” Clark said.

    Mickey Hatmakers, who heads the Kentucky Narcotics Officers Association, calls it a getaway drug.

    “It is very clear in the states where cannabis has been legalized for medical purposes, marijuana use by 12 to 17-year-olds is the highest,” Hatmaker said.

    Because medical marijuana is expected be a hot topic over the next year, the legislative hearing was aimed at getting a head start on the controversy.

    UofL researcher Gregory Barnes said the compound CBD in marijuana provides protection from seizures in epilepsy patients.

    Jaimie Montalvo, of Kentuckians for Medical Marijuana, said prescribed drugs also have a downside. He has multiple sclerosis.

    “As you can imagine, these prescriptions have dozens of side effects liver problems, kidney problems. They cause a lot of issues in our body,” Montalvo said.

    A packed house listened to pros and cons.

    As of Friday, no bills regarding medical marijuana had been pre-filed for the 2017 Legislature.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Kentucky Nurses Association endorses medical marijuana


    By Lawrence Smith

    FRANKFORT, Ky. (WDRB) — The push to legalize medical marijuana in Kentucky has picked up a major supporter.

    The Kentucky Nurses Association has come out in support of the idea, calling it an issue of patients’ rights.

    Twenty-two years ago, a car wreck injured Eric Crawford’s spinal cord, leaving him partially paralyzed.

    He says he began smoking marijuana after experiencing bad side effects from conventional drugs.

    “I don’t have to take pain pills anymore, and I take very little muscle relaxer. So, yes, it’s helping me,” said Crawford, who is from Maysville, Ky.

    Stories like Crawford’s are why the Kentucky Nurses Association is now endorsing medical marijuana.

    “I hope that folks are going to see that when registered nurses say this is an important access to care issue, that folks are going to look at it as the medical and patient care issue that it is and not as a social issue,” said Maureen Keenan, executive director of the KNA.

    Supporters of medical marijuana made their case to lawmakers Friday during a special hearing of the Interim Joint Committee on Licensing and Occupations.

    “It’s not about having a party. It’s not about having fun. It’s about quality of life,” said Jaime Montalvo of Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana.

    But others, such as the Kentucky Medical Association and law enforcement agencies, are urging caution.

    “This is a gateway drug that leads our children and young adults down the road to illicit drug use and addiction,” warned Mickey Hatmaker, president of the Kentucky Narcotics Officers Association.

    The Kentucky Medical Association says it wants to see more research.

    “KMA cannot support legislation intended to involve physicians in the area of medicinal marijuana outside of scientific, clinical trials,” said Corey Meadows of the KMA.

    But the chairman of the committee says it is possible that a limited bill, perhaps one allowing dying patients to use marijuana, could get through the 2017 session.

    “I see the dialogue changing a bit, and I think a narrowly-crafted bill might have some success,” said Sen. John Schickel (R-Union.)

    Crawford says it is evidence that minds are slowly changing.

    “Since the Kentucky Nurses Association has come out, that’s a big step for us,” he said.

    While supporters of medical marijuana say they’re cautiously optimistic, they also know, at the Capitol, that momentum could quickly go up in smoke.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Hemp farmer contends harassment at justice center


    Sergeant discussed issue with deputies, considers matter closed

     

    A Bowling Green hemp advocate and business owner claims he was ordered to leave a baseball cap with a hemp leaf logo on it with court security personnel as he entered the Warren County Justice Center on Thursday.

    Chad Wilson, who owns Modern Farm Concepts and is vice president of sales and marketing for hemp products company Green Remedy, said he accompanied his son to the justice center to get his driver’s license.

    After passing through the metal detectors in the front lobby of the justice center, Wilson, who was wearing a T-shirt and hat promoting Green Remedy, said a deputy told Wilson he would have to leave the hemp-logo hat with court security or else he would have to leave.

    Hemp and marijuana are both part of the cannabis plant genus, but hemp is genetically different and generally has negligible amounts of THC, the active chemical in marijuana.

    Kentucky and several other states have legalized the cultivation and research of industrial hemp, which can be used in the making of paper, fabrics, cosmetics and several other products. Hemp growers, however, must get permission from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration to raise the crop.

    Green Remedy is one of 167 registered participants in this year’s Kentucky Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

    Wilson attempted to explain what was on his hat and that he was a licensed grower, but court security officers said that Wilson’s hat promoted marijuana, Wilson said Friday.

    “I was told basically that I had no right to come into a government building that my taxes paid for,” Wilson said. “I didn’t want to make a scene because I was trying to be a good dad, but I should have stood for my rights.”

    Wilson said he gave the hat to court security officers, who stored it in a lock box until he left the justice center. As he left, Wilson recorded a video of himself in which he gave an account of the incident and posted it to his Facebook page.

    Later on Thursday, Wilson said he went to the Warren County Sheriff’s Office to complain about how he was treated and that Chief Deputy Maj. Tommy Smith apologized.

    The court security officers are a division of the sheriff’s office.

    Sgt. Andy McDowell said he was apprised of the situation after Wilson went to the sheriff’s office and he met with the court security officers on duty to discuss the incident.

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