Owner of Mike’s Rock Shop dies at 69 years old


January 8, 2015

Written by: Sheree Krider

 

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Victoria Fontana, owner of Mike’s Rock Shop in Barren County Kentucky died Sunday, January 4th at her home in Cave City.

Born March 20, 1946 she was 69 years old at the time of death.

“Vicky” was a model citizen and will be missed by all those in Cave City, Barren County and surrounding areas.  It was a sorrowful wake up call for everyone in the area.

Known for her loving and caring nature for all those around her ‘HAVE I TOLD YOU LATELY THAT I LOVE YOU” was written in her memorial which was held Wednesday at Patton Funeral Home in Park City, Kentucky.

She was the Widow of Mike Fontana who passed away some years ago and she had diligently carried on at the “Rock Shop” since his death.  The future of the “Rock Shop” is unknown at this time but is expected to remain open in the interim.

She is to be laid to rest in Columbus, Indiana at an undisclosed location.

May she rest in peace.

smk

Mountain lion killed in Kentucky


Joseph Gerth, The Courier-Journal 8:45 a.m. EST December 17, 2014

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A Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife officer killed a mountain lion on a Bourbon County farm on Monday, marking the first confirmed sighting of a mountain lion in Kentucky since before the Civil War, said Mark Marraccini, a spokesman for the agency.

Marraccini said a farmer spotted the cat in a tree and alerted the department. When the officer responded, he found the animal had been trapped in different tree by a barking dog and decided it was best to “dispatch it.”

Mountain lions were once native to Kentucky but they were killed off here more than a century ago, Marraccini said.

Mountain lions are the largest cats found in North America and can measure up to eight feet from nose to tail and weigh up to 180 pounds. Also known as cougars, pumas, panthers and catamounts, the cats are considered top-line predators because no other species feed on them.

Marraccini said the wildlife officer shot the cat because it was about 5:30 p.m. and getting dark and he feared that it would slip away in darkness and threaten people in the nearby city of Paris.

“If that cat had left that tree, it would have disappeared into the brush and it was a fairly populated area,” said Marraccini, who said it would have taken several hours and dark before a state veterinarian could retrieve the tranquilizer from her safe and get it to the scene had officials taken that route.

“It sounds good but it’s pretty impractical,” said Marraccini, who said the officer who shot the cat made the right call.

“That’s the way the officers deemed to handle it and I don’t see any reason why it shouldn’t be handled that way,” he said.

Marraccini said a state veterinarian will conduct a necropsy on the cat Tuesday to determine if it is a wild cat or a former pet that was either released or escaped.

According to the Cougar Network, the cat is mostly confined to the western United States but is advancing east. For years, the Mississippi River has been thought to be a barrier to the mountain lion’s eastern expansion. But its clear they have been getting close to Kentucky.

They have colonized in South Dakota, Nebraska and Missouri, said Amy Rodrigues, a staff biologist for the Mountain Lion Foundation, and there have been sightings in recent years in Indiana and even downtown Chicago.

Rodrigues said that mountain lions each need more than 100 square miles to survive and many of the animals being killed as they expand east are young males under the age of two that have been kicked out by their mothers. They often travel east looking for deer, water and female cougars.

But Rodrigues said states that kill the animals when they enter are wrong for doing it and that the animals shouldn’t cause fear. “If you’re a deer, they’re a little dangerous. If you’re a human, not so much,” she said. “Attacks on people are not that common. There have only been 22 deaths in the last 120 years.”

She said people are at greater risk of dying from bee stings and lightning strikes than they are from cougar attacks.

They get a bad rap because “they are large animals with sharp teeth,” Rodrigues said.

She added the presence of mountain lions in an ecosystem adds to biological diversity, which she said helps the environment recover from natural disaster and diseases that affect the fauna in a region.

Mark Dowling, a director of the Cougar Network, which advocates for the use of science to understand the animals, said the population was being pushed further and further west until the 1960s when a number of western and midwestern states began to classify them as game animals rather than vermin, and limiting people’s right to kill them.

Since then, he said, the cats have been slowly reclaiming their old turf.

Marraccini said there is no official protocol about how to handle more mountain lions if they are found in Kentucky but he doubts that they will be allowed to colonize here like they have in many western states.

“Every one of them is handled on it’s own,” said Marraccini.

Marraccini said that people and legislators probably would be opposed to allowing the cats to stay in the state. “When you have a population essentially that has had generations and generations and generations that have not had top-line predators, you think about it. You going to let your kids wait for the school bus in the dark? …”

“From a wildlife diversity perspective, it would be a neat thing but from a social aspect, probably not,” he said.

Dowling wouldn’t take a position on whether the cat should have been killed but said that most states that have had the cats moving through them have just left the cats alone. In fact, he said he can’t think of a state wildlife agency that shoots them on sight but he noted that South Dakota will shoot them when they enter a city.

But he said human attacks are few and far between, even in California where there are thousands of the cats, some of them living within large cities like Los Angeles.

“It’s very, very rare for them to show any aggression toward humans,” he said. “They, in fact, have a fear of people.”

Animals like the mountain lion once near extinction or limited in their range are rebounding across the country. The first gray wolf confirmed in Kentucky in generations was shot by a hunter a year and a half ago near Munfordville.

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What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?


 

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The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

Ban Fracking in Your Area

No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

Learn More

 

Hunters Killed 20 Bears in Kentucky During Season


 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — State Fish and Wildlife officials say hunters in Kentucky claimed 20 black bears during the season that ended in December.

It was the first season with a new expanded bear hunting zone and an archery and crossbow season.

Hunters can now hunt bears in 16 Kentucky counties, up from four counties in 2012.

In the recent season, hunters harvested eight male and two female bears during the firearms season. They took six males and four females during the archery and crossbow season.

Seven were killed in Letcher County, and three bears each were taken in Harlan, Leslie and Perry counties.

Modern-day bear hunting in Kentucky began in 2009.

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Furry intruder caught on camera (HERE’S THE BEARS!)


 

OHIO COUNTY, KY (WAVE) – A furry intruder was caught on camera in Western Kentucky.

A family went outside and found a black bear raiding their deer-feeder.

Wildlife officials suspect the young bear was either forced out of its territory in eastern Kentucky or Tennessee by another black bear and is wandering around trying to find a girlfriend.

In June, there was a bear sighting near Mammoth Cave and on July 12 five people in Daviess County reported they saw a bear near Masonville.

Experts said the bear appears to be a small and estimate he weighs between 100 and 150 pounds.

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7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Civil War


Originally posted on Hammerhead Combat Systems:

Dear Readers, As a Lover of History, I felt it was TIME TO DISPENSE WITH THE HISTORICAL INACCURACIES. Please seek out the truth for yourselves. And just so you know, the lame-stream media and the Government are bad places to start. -HCS Staff

Article By Daniel Amduri

lincolnmemorialWith all of the controversy surrounding the Confederate Flag, and with Apple Inc. now removing all civil war related games from their app offerings, we have reached a point where propaganda has begun to outweigh the real truth.

The following seven points from Daniel Ameduri of Future Money Trends is an effort to clear up some of the erroneous information being disseminated by agenda-driven politicos and activists:

1. The SLAVE states of Maryland, Missouri, Delaware, Kentucky, as well as the District of Columbia, were SLAVE STATES in the Union that fought for the NORTH.

2. Two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was made in…

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Historian changes strategy in Billy the Kid death certificate fight


Originally posted on KRQE News 13:

FORT SUMNER, N.M. (KRQE) – The man trying to get a death certificate issued for Billy the Kid to end the controversy over his death once and for all has withdrawn his court petition, but not his fight.

Arizona historian Robert Stahl has studied Billy the Kid for more than a decade and says there’s truth to the story he was killed by Pat Garrett.

But some still claim Billy the Kid escaped and the story was all a big cover up.

Stahl was hoping to put an end to the tales by asking a district court in Fort Sumner to issue a death certificate. However, he’s hit a few road blocks due to how much time has passed, so he’s opted to withdraw his petition and try another route.

Stahl says he’ll share details of his new strategy soon, all he’ll say right now is that it’s in the…

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County’s 1st hemp seeds of 2015 planted


More, bigger plots coming, advocate says

  • By Eli Pace, New Era editor

 

 

 

If last year’s industrial hemp planting was a trial run, this year Christian County hemp farmers are going all out with what’s expected to be 85 total acres of the crop spread across four local pilot projects.

The first pilot went into the ground Friday at Jeff Davis’ Pembroke farm, said Katie Moyer, a local hemp advocate who’s been heavily involved in the push to legalize the crop, which can be used to make everything from paper to plastics.

“It was actually done in record time,” Moyer said of Davis’ second hemp planting. “He got the seed Friday and planted Friday evening.”

Winner of the chamber’s 2015 Famer of the Year award, Davis planted a half-acre of hemp last year on his 1,300-acre farm. This time, according to Moyer, he put down about five acres’ worth of seeds on a different strip of land.

That’s a small chunk of the roughly 85 acres that’s expected to be planted across the four local pilots, but depending on how far the seed goes, Moyer said, the actual acreage could be a little more or a little less.

Compared to the two half-acre pilots planted last year in Christian County, that’s quite the step up.

“Yeah, big time,” Moyer said.

If everything goes according to plan, seed for the largest of the Christian County hemp pilots could be planted as early as Tuesday. When the seeds sprout, the crop should be visible from the Pennyrile Parkway at the Crofton interchange.

“This one is going to be very big and very visible,” Moyer said, adding that, because of media coverage and increased hemp awareness, more and more Kentucky farmers are showing interest in the crop.

“People really had an opportunity to see what was going on (last year). It’s like a snowball effect. We’re definitely a lot busier now than we were last year.”

In line with that growth, Moyer and a handful of individuals have formed a new company called “Legacy Hemp.”

Reached over the phone Monday, Moyer said she was working on filing the necessary paperwork with the Kentucky Secretary of State for what is to be a certified seed breeder that’s being created to sell hemp seed to Kentucky farmers and facilitate some of the processing that’s involved with taking the crop to market. A company website is in the works.

“Because everything is so new, we’re really feeling things out,” she said.

Moyer explained that, more than anything, she hopes people realize industrial hemp is not marijuana.

The two are related plant species, but hemp contains only trace amounts of THC, the chemical that can register as high as 30 percent or more in marijuana and produces intoxicating effects in humans.

Because of the high visibility of this year’s crops, Moyer also said she hopes any would-be pot users don’t make the mistake of thinking hemp is an illicit crop, try to smoke it or steal any of the hemp plants to sell for a profit.

Reach Eli Pace at 270-887-3235 or epace@kentuckynewera.com.

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Deer Sterilization Program Blamed For Deaths


Originally posted on CBS New York:

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — When East Hampton Village began a non-lethal program in an effort to reduce its deer population earlier this year, it was accepted as a non-lethal answer to the growing problem.

But now, some wildlife experts fear, in a few cases, that it’s having the opposite effect, CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff reports.

Officials believe the surgical sterilization of female deer was the best solution to its population problem, calling it a good middle ground between killing the animals and doing nothing.

A non-profit called White Buffalo tranquilized 114 deer with dart guns and transported them to veterinarians to be sterilized.

Now, deer are showing up dead.

Hampton Wildlife rescuer Dell Cullum found a pregnant doe delivering twins and in septic shock. The deer had tags in her ears which means she was one who had been sterilized.

Another wildlife rescuer Ginnie Frati says she too recently found two dying does — one with an…

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10 Of History’s Strangest Duels


Originally posted on Give Me Liberty:

This is from ListVerse.

I knew about the Lincoln and the Twain duels, but I had never heard of the other stories.

Duels were once considered the height of chivalry, the proper way for people of a certain class to settle their differences. Not all duels went off without a hitch, though, and certainly not all of them were fought with pistols or swords. The stories behind some duels—and some of those that never happened—are much, much stranger.

Featured image credit: Lock, Stock, and History

10 Billiard Balls

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Sometimes, a duel is the proper and honorable way for gentlemen to settle their differences, whatever they may be. Other duels seem more like frat party dares gone really wrong.

On what was an otherwise quiet September day in 1843, a game of billiards in Maisonfort, France went terribly sideways. The two opponents, Melfant and Lenfant, began to argue about how the game was…

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Female amputee attempting record-breaking hike of Appalachian Trail


Originally posted on KRQE News 13:

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(WSLS 10) – Thousands of people hike the entire Appalachian Trail each year and one of those is trying to break a record.

Niki Rellon wants to be the first female leg amputee to finish the trail. Rellon lost her leg 16 months ago in a repelling accident.

She fell down 40 feet on her left leg. She cracked her helmet, broke her pelvis and spine, and had to get her left foot amputated.

However a few months later she started training to hike the Appalachian Trail. As a former triathlete she felt compelled to do it.

“It’s tough of course,” says Rellon. “My leg after eight miles starts hurting bad and you have to be headstrong.”

She’s hiked about 700 miles so far and is expected to be finished in October.

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Hemp planted at Locust Grove


Sheldon S. Shafer, The Courier-Journal 10:10 p.m. EDT June 5, 2015

 

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“Today hemp is grown mostly in Canada. and the seeds and oil are imported for culinary purposes, but historically hemp was cultivated mainly for use in canvas and rope.”

Locust Grove will have a hemp festival on Aug. 9. It will include a hemp village where products can be purchased, a hemp café with foods made from hemp oil and seeds, rope and paper making demonstrations, and talks by experts on hemp.

Also at the festival two films will be shown — “Hemp for Victory,” a World War II-era short documentary, and “Bringing It Home,” a film about the modern benefits of hemp.

Sponsors of the festival include Rainbow Blossom, Caudill Seed & New Earth. Admission to the festival is $5 per person.

Locust Grove is a 55-acre, 18th-century farm site and National Historic Landmark at 561 Blankenbaker Lane, just off River Road. The site has a mansion that was the home of the Croghan family. It served as a gathering place for George Rogers Clark and his associates and was visited by several presidents.

The property has a welcome center with a gift shop, museum and meeting space.

Reporter Sheldon S. Shafer can be reached at (502) 582-7089. Follow him on Twitter at @sheldonshafer.

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