Drug overdose deaths in Kentucky decreased 15 percent last year.


Nov. 19, 2019

Panel updated on battle against fatal overdoses

FRANKFORT – Drug overdose deaths in Kentucky decreased 15 percent last year. That’s 233 fewer people dying.

“We were very pleased to see 233 families that did not have to go through the pain of losing a loved one to a preventable death,” Office of Drug Control Policy Executive Director Van Ingram said while testifying before yesterday’s meeting of the Interim Joint Committee on Health, Welfare and Family Services. “We are certainly not declaring victory. We are not celebrating, but we do feel confident that we are moving in the right direction.”

He was among a group that spoke about the results of numerous policy initiatives in Kentucky to reduce the number of drug overdose deaths. Last year’s decrease followed years of steady increases in the death toll, driven mostly by a rise in opioid abuse, heroin and fentanyl.

Ingram said the 15 percent decrease was a bright spot because the nation as a whole saw a decrease of just under 5 percent.

He said some of the policy initiatives include curbing the number of controlled substances prescribed by doctors. From 2015 to 2018, the number of opioid analgesics dispensed in Kentucky fell by a little over 800,000. That’s equivalent to 64 million fewer dosage units.

Dr. Doug Oyler of University of Kentucky HealthCare testified that the initiative had reduced opioid prescriptions by 1,300 annually just within that health care system.

“I love hearing that some … of the legislative actions we have taken to really move this conversation forward are making a difference,” said Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, co-chair of the committee, and former director of the Northern Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy.

One initiative is expanding the use of medication-assisted treatment, known as MAT, to treat opioid use disorders. Ingram said 1,240 doctors practicing in Kentucky have received a federal waiver to prescribe the drug buprenorphine, used in MAT. Ingram added, however, that most of those doctors are treating five or fewer patients.

Buprenorphine has also become the No. 1 drug being diverted or given to another person for illicit use. Ingram said that was “tragic” but that the abuse of buprenorphine generally doesn’t cause overdose deaths.

Rep. Robert Goforth, R-East Bernstadt, a pharmacist by trade, asked if Kentucky needed to pass legislation to increase training for doctors in hopes of reducing the diversion of the drug. Ingram said Kentucky could require more rigorous training than the eight-hour online course federal authorities require before prescribing buprenorphine.

“We should look into that,” Goforth said in response.

Ingram said arrests for possession of heroin were down 15 percent and arrests for trafficking heroin were down 12 percent from 2017 through March of this year. He added that heroin deaths were down almost 54 percent during the same period.

Ingram attributed the downturn to fentanyl from China flooding the United States. He said the drug cartels recognized that it was a more profitable business model to buy chemicals from China than it is to grow opium poppies.

“Unless the Chinese live up to their promises and make real efforts to control the chemical supply in that country … fentanyl is going to be the business model we see,” Ingram said. “That is alarming.”

He highlighted the fact that fentanyl trafficking arrests are up 73 percent in the state.

“There is a lot of work to be done,” Ingram said, adding that there were still 1,333 lethal overdoses last year. “That isn’t acceptable. It’s not a number we can live with.”

Ingram said the 10 counties where people are statistically at the greatest risk of overdosing are Madison, Clark, Kenton, Boyd, Gallatin, Pendleton, Owen, Jefferson, Grant and Campbell.

“As a state, we have come to learn treatment isn’t enough,” Ingram said as he described some recent initiatives undertaken by his office. “Transitional housing for people in early recovery and employment support for people in early recovery are just as important as anything else we can do.

“People do get better, but it doesn’t always happen on our timetable. It happens on theirs. We want to do the things we can to increase the odds that people stay in recovery and continue to get better.”

Rep. Danny Bentley, R-Russell, also a pharmacist, asked Ingram about recent court settlements against drug companies and pharmacy chains accused of fueling the addiction crisis.

“There is lots of blame to go around, but there is only a small group that profited,” Ingram said.

END

(KY) Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel


For Immediate Release

November 18, 2019

Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel

FRANKFORT—Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mark Haney said his organization’s advice for Kentucky’s growing number of hemp producers is “be careful.”

Haney told the Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture today that farmers are encouraged to enter the growing hemp industry, but with minimal risk. Kentucky is still in its first five years of modern hemp production which began in 2014 under the state’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

The research pilot program is ending this year, with the state’s Hemp Licensing Program entering a new stage of commercial production in 2020.

“We tell all the producers, and have been saying all along, be careful. Go slow. Don’t risk any more than you can afford to put at risk,” said Haney. The caution comes as many farmers, he said, look to hemp as a replacement for once-reliable sources of income—like tobacco—amid today’s agriculture market disruptions and downturns.

Making hemp as profitable as tobacco once was to Kentucky farmers, if possible, will take time, said Haney.

“It would be wonderful if we could do that,” he said. “So we’re telling folks, ‘help us build the industry and don’t just try to swing for a home run.’”

Haney said the Farm Bureau has formed a hemp advisory committee to work on issues that could help farmers build the industry moving forward. That work, he said, could come in handy in any future legislative discussions concerning the farmer’s role in the hemp industry. Haney said he hopes hemp processors will take a similar approach regarding their role in the industry.

“Most of the questions about hemp that I’ve heard were not about production of hemp. It was about the processing of hemp and how we transport it, how we get paid for it, (about) the systems from the farm gate through the rest of the pipeline,” said Haney.

Rep. Joe Graviss, D-Versailles, asked Haney if the Farm Bureau’s hemp advisory committee could look into whether Kentucky farmers are being fairly compensated for their crop. He also encouraged a standard means to test hemp products, saying he would like the organization to look into “standardization in testing” of hemp products on store shelves to make sure “what is on the shelf at a gas station or a pharmacy is actually going to contain the same stuff.”

Concerns about cash flow to hemp producers also voiced by Graviss were shared earlier in the meeting with Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy Executive Director Warren Beeler, who said farmers have had high hopes for hemp amid uncertainty in other agricultural markets. Now farmers are finding that hemp production brings its own uncertainty, he told lawmakers.

“We don’t know exactly where we’re going to end up,” said Beeler. “But hemp has a chance to help us. It has a chance to be maybe that tobacco that we thought we’d never have a replacement for.”

One of the most critical issues facing many Kentucky farmers, said Haney, is the need for high-speed broadband. While most Kentuckians have internet access, Haney said rural areas remain that don’t have the connection speed necessary to use high-tech apps and programs now commonplace in modern agriculture.

“If you can’t operate the device that you’re working with because the speed is so low that you can’t even download the programming … it’s pretty sad. And it’s important to our members more now than it has ever been before,” said Haney, adding that his organization will likely approach the Kentucky General Assembly for help on the matter in the future.

Sen. Stephen West, R-Paris, an attorney and cattle farmer, said internet connectivity is important to him and his constituents, including a number of rural Kentuckians with limited internet access. West said that while full implementation the KentuckyWired project—which is intended to provide gigabit-speed access statewide—is expected within the next year or so, he wonders what support there is from the private sector for improved internet speed.

“They have to address these issues to get more service out to our farmers and rural areas,” West said.

Haney said the Farm Bureau is communicating with the private sector and is “hoping to put together some stakeholders that will continue to work on this in the near future.”

END



https://kentuckywired.ky.gov/Pages/index.aspx

Kentucky Launches Selling Farmers Tax Credit Program to Sustain Agricultural Industry


Applications for new incentive program accepted beginning Dec. 16

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 21, 2019) – Kentucky today launched a new program offering farmers incentives for selling their property to beginning farmers, an effort to further sustain one of the state’s most important industries.

Gov. Matt Bevin and partner organizations announced the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit (KSFTC) program, which will begin accepting applications Monday, Dec. 16.

“Farmers are a vital part of Kentucky’s economy, and this new program will help ensure our state benefits from its bountiful supply of agricultural land to the fullest extent possible,” Gov. Bevin said. “We are thankful for all who partnered in creating the KSFTC program, and we encourage selling farmers to take advantage of this exciting new opportunity.”

Eligible selling farmers could receive tax credits up to 5% of the purchase price of qualifying assets, with a $25,000 cap per calendar year and a $100,000 lifetime cap.

“The Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit program is an innovative way to incentivize those farmers who are interested in selling their farmland to sell to new or beginning farmers,” Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “The average age of a farmer in Kentucky is about the age of retirement. We need to continue incentivizing agriculture as a career path so that Kentucky can maintain its reputation as a top-notch agricultural state.”

Both the selling and acquiring parties must meet the following criteria for beginning and selling farmers:

  • A beginning farmer cannot have previously owned any agricultural land for a period exceeding 10 years. In addition, beginning farmers must commit to managing and operating a for-profit farming business a minimum of five years after purchasing eligible agricultural land.
  • Selling farmers cannot have more than 50 full-time employees and must be the legal owner of agricultural land and assets sold to a beginning farmer. Sales involving immediate family members do not qualify for tax credit consideration.

Before completing a sale of agricultural assets, applicants should review the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit Guidelines for more detailed program information and eligibility requirements. After completing a sale, both the beginning farmer and selling farmer must submit applications to determine tax credit eligibility.

A number of partners were instrumental in KSFTC’s development. This collaborative effort included essential contributions from the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, state legislators, Kentucky Farm Bureau, Farm Credit Mid-America and Kentucky Agricultural Development Board.

Mark Haney, Kentucky Farm Bureau president, said the program offers promise for beginning farmers needing access to agricultural land.

“Preserving our farmland is so critically important to the viability of Kentucky agriculture,” Haney said. “Access to land is one of the biggest challenges facing our young farmers.  We are hopeful the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit program will assist us in keeping Kentucky agriculture the strong economic engine it is for generations to come.”

Sen. David Givens, of Greensburg, said KSFTC will help support rural Kentucky.

“I was proud to aid in this effort to keep Kentucky farmland active in agricultural production,” Sen. Givens said. “By assisting young farmers in acquiring land through tax breaks for the selling family, we continue to strengthen our rural communities.”

Rep. Bart Rowland, of Tompkinsville, said KSFTC will help give beginning farmers the jumpstart they need.

“This program is without a doubt a win-win for our commonwealth,” Rep. Rowland said. “It keeps farmland in production and allows a new generation of farmers to get their foot in the door. Farming is not only a way of life, but a way to improve the quality of life for our communities.”

While this program provides tax credits to selling farmers, other state agricultural programs, such as the Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation’s Beginning Farmer Loan Program, are available to assist beginning farmers.

Visit www.thinkkentucky.com/Entrepreneurship/KSFTC.aspx for additional information or to fill out an application.

###


Governor of Kentucky

Questions? Contact us

BLAKE ASHBY; 2020 LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE


Blake

Video LINK above!

American Capitalism is BROKEN and we need to fix it!

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American Capitalism is broken, and we need to fix it. What made our economy great, our country great, was a compromise many decades ago – Democratic Capitalism. A key part of that compromise was an agreement that we would all play by the same set of financial rules. One set of rules.

And it worked. Because we all played by the same set of rules, everyone had a chance to participate in our economy, and everybody had a chance to benefit from our economy. Until the 1980s’ the wealth our economy created was shared by everyone, wealthy, middle class and even the poor. Every income level got to participate in the benefits of capitalism. It was a rising tide that lifted all boats.

Since the 1980s’ the exact opposite has been true. Virtually all of the financial gains generated by our economy over the last 30 years, more than 21 trillion dollars in wealth, has gone almost exclusively to the very top, to the very wealthy. In the last three decades, the middle class and the poor have received only a tiny, tiny sliver the wealth created by our economy during that time.

This was NOT the natural result of capitalism. It happened because the Keepers of Capitalism allowed a second set of rules to be slipped into different parts of our economy that only benefitted a small part of our population. A second set of rules that allowed Corporate CEO salaries to go from 20 times workers wages to 300 times workers wages. A second set of rules that allows private equity funds to buy, strip and bankrupt healthy companies. A second set of rules that allow Wall Street to generate tens of billions of dollars in profits from selling and insuring things it doesn’t even own. A second set of rules that allows the very wealthy to avoid almost any scrutiny from the IRS.

We can fix all of these. We can fix the distortion that allowed CEO salaries to skyrocket. We can end the advantages of private equity. We can keep Wall Street from selling things it doesn’t own. We can make the IRS treat every taxpayer exactly the same. We can do it. We can get back to one set of rules for everybody. We can get back to an economy where EVERYBODY shares in the gains.

And we should do it, because capitalism actually works better if there is one set of rules for everybody.

Fixing American capitalism won’t be easy, because the people that are making all of the money don’t want the system to change. But we can do it. If we all work together, we can get back to one set of financial rules for everybody. We can get back to an economy where every American benefits. We can get back to Democratic Capitalism.

BLAKE ASHBY 2020 LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE

https://www.facebook.com/Ashby2020/

https://www.facebook.com/Ashby2020/videos/501144617410405/

https://www.lp.org/

On Tuesday, November 5th, WE Must Be The Change In Kentucky! Vote HICKS/CORMICAN! This Is Why…


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On Tuesday, November 5th, the most important election in Kentucky in many years is about to happen!

I am not here to argue with anyone.  I am here to present the facts and my opinion as I see it.

Therefore,

First of all, you must vote to see change!  If you are eligible to Vote and are registered to do so – You must VOTE!  It is your Civic Duty.  And if you are eligible to vote but did not register, shame on you!

IF you want a change in your Government, you have to vote for the people who will CHANGE the way things are being done in           Kentucky!

You CANNOT vote for a Democrat or Republican and expect anything to change – only to get worse!  So if that is what you want, then go for it!

Otherwise, BE THE CHANGE that Kentucky must have in order to succeed!  John Hicks and Ann Cormican – Libertarian are running for the most important office in the State.  That is where we must start!  At the top!

On November 1st, Rep. Jason Nemes prefiled this years “medical marijuana bill” for Kentucky.  It will become House Bill 136 when the Session opens in January, and if it passes we will once again become Slaves to the system!  A few points on the Bill as written are:

*  Department for Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control to implement and regulate the medicinal marijuana program in Kentucky;

*  establish the Division of Medicinal Marijuana within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control;

establish restrictions on the possession of medicinal marijuana by qualifying patients, visiting patients, and designated caregivers;

*  establish certain protections for cardholders;

*  establish professional protections for practitioners; to provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal marijuana;

*  establish professional protections for attorneys;

* prohibit the possession and use of medicinal marijuana while operating a motor vehicle;

to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;

* to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;

*  to require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; to establish requirements for registry identification cards; to establish registry identification card fees; to require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system; to establish the application requirements for a registry identification card; to establish when the department may deny an application for a registry identification card;

*  establish certain responsibilities for cardholders; to establish when a registry identification card may be revoked;

*  establish various cannabis business licensure categories; to establish tiering of cannabis business licenses; to require certain information be included in an application for a cannabis business license; to establish when the department may deny an application for a cannabis business license;

*  to establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives;

*  establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses;

to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state;

*  to establish requirements for cannabis cultivators, including cultivation square footage limits; to establish requirements for cannabis dispensaries; to establish requirements for safety compliance facilities; to establish requirements for cannabis processors; to establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses;

to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;

*  to establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; to establish the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to establish the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; and to establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys;

*  create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax of 12% for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries; to require that 80% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to require that 20% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law;

Is this what you want?

The above is not all inclusive of the regulations, and they will no doubt change again when it is introduced in January.  Read the Bill!

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Please note that there are NO provisions for “smokable cannabis”, and NO mention of Children’s rights either.  There are NO provisions for growing your own plants, and this BILL in my opinion is being promoted for the Corporate/Pharmaceutical industry. 

Out of all the Bills previously submitted for “medical” or “adult use” Cannabis in Kentucky this is the worst one yet!  Do not fall for the legal lies which they are feeding you because they are preying on your fears for your Children’s needs, mostly.  The fact is, what M.D., is going to give you permission or a written statement that will give you the right to medicate your child with Cannabis?  The answer to that is virtually none, and if there was even one that WOULD do it there is no guarantee that you will be able to access that Physician!

The bill would prohibit the smoking of marijuana for medical purposes, but would allow other forms of consumption, such as edibles, oils and pills.  A 12% excise tax is proposed for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries.  LINK

I have consulted with several other Senior Activists in Kentucky over this issue and we all surmised basically the same opinions on the matter!  This is in NO way a repeal of prohibition of Cannabis and in no way will it ascertain our rights to this plant – medically or otherwise.  It is however, worth some $$$ to Corporate Ventures and Kentucky Government as it now stands!

In my opinion, for those parents who have seriously ill children in need of this medicine they need to consider moving to a honest medical cannabis State such as Colorado or elsewhere.  For those who are unable to do this due to financial situations we must set up a fund to enable them to do so.  I can honestly say that if it were my child that is exactly what I would do!  Not because I want to leave my home in Kentucky, but because my Childs life is more important and I would be compelled to do so, IF John Hicks and Ann Cormican are not elected. 

The “Undergreen Railroad” is one such organization.  I will look into this organization further, especially if Hicks/Cormican are not elected, because you all are going to need it!

Finally, we come to the third candidate in the governor’s race. Libertarian John Hicks. John is a Vietnam Era Army veteran, a former school teacher, and currently an IT consultant. He has a BA Degree in Political Science and History. He has never held political office, but ran previously for State Representative (District 43) in 2018. John is pro-life and believes government should stay out of personal issues.
John supports the legalization of marijuana, expanded gaming, and the development of hemp as sources of additional state revenue (better than raising taxes!). He also believes that the best way to compensate for budget shortfalls is to reduce the size of government and streamlining operations. Additionally, John Hicks supports election reform; specifically by introducing run-offs, using ranked choice voting, proportional representation, multi member districts which would end partisan gerrymandering.
   LINK

41313794_10217056915675593_6264305987008593920_n(1)

Manages Kentucky Open Source Society

John Hicks IS qualified for the position of Governor, as he IS ONE OF US!  He will bring us liberty and fight for OUR rights as Kentucky Citizens!

We need to show the entire Country what Kentucky can do when faced with such a dire situation – It’s not just about Cannabis – It is about Liberty and  Justice for All!

Please make the right choice for our State, our Families, our Children, and our Country!

Do not condemn Our State once again!

God Bless You All

smkrider

11/3/2019

https://www.facebook.com/HicksForKentucky/

https://www.facebook.com/hicksforkygov/

https://www.facebook.com/jason.nemes.1/posts/3321913687848659

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3321910424515652&set=a.170767459629980&type=3&theater

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=33

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/prefiled/BR366.html?fbclid=IwAR1A_cH3LEwMDixbcMN1o5u5XrRB-gFQZM4qmAaZXrIZa9aYUjEjmeA4vgE

https://www.facebook.com/johnrhicks?__tn__=%2Cd-]-h-R&eid=ARANzRCvypZKWWjzlKWQixSeBkF7a97sNZINNMIU-dY8JZZgHxFfuPbr1urQ6ro5Ui9nfNGocWfFP88Z

http://www.anotheropinionblog.com/2019/11/the-2019-kentucky-election-main-event.html?fbclid=IwAR2vzCm-4QDieeyVDP2XKDUtgvSHkcivekuOVKzOCd2JiYaFJEGca1AFr7o

https://www.wlky.com/article/kentucky-lawmaker-prefiles-bill-to-legalize-medical-marijuana/29669383?fbclid=IwAR2a8kMPicpnBgioaeKcHaEoYxiuBNGC3bzvwhGsb10DS7DoVeHIMu3wBD0#

http://www.ladybud.com/2014/01/14/the-undergreen-railroad-helping-patients-relocate-for-cannabis-access/

Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks


Web Exclusive: Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks

By Randy Moore | August 28, 2019 at 4:18 PM CDT – Updated August 28 at 4:18 PM

OWENSBORO, Ky. (WFIE) – We now have 14 News web exclusive interviews with all three candidates in the race for Kentucky Governor.

You know about Republican Governor Matt Bevin and Democrat Attorney General Andy Beshear, but you might not know much about Libertarian candidate John Hicks.

Hicks lives on the west side of Louisville. He is an I.T. specialist with experience as a public school teacher and community newspaper publisher and editor.

Hicks met with Randy Moore at the 14 News Owensboro studio.

He says with polarization going on with the Republican and Democrat parties, now is the the perfect time for the emergence of the Libertarian Party.

“The two party system just basically pits people against each other. It divides you up into two groups and makes you hate on each other. And that’s a way to keep people distracted so the powers that be that control these parties get their work done. I think people are beginning to see that and that’s why they are coming to the Libertarian Party,” said Hicks.

CONTINUE READING…

VIEW VIDEO AT THIS LINK

FACEBOOK PAGE THIS LINK

KENTUCKY LIBERTARIAN PARTY THIS LINK

PLEASE JOIN US NOW AND BE THE CHANGE FOR KENTUCKY!  WE NEED SOMEONE WHO CARES ABOUT US, NOT THEIR BANK ACCOUNTS AND SPECIAL INTERESTS!  THIS MAY BE THE LAST CHANCE WE HAVE TO GET THIS RIGHT!  DON’T LET ANOTHER DEMOCRAT OR REPUBLICAN SET US UP FOR FAILURE AGAIN!  DON’T BELIEVE THE LIES!

Statement from Gov. Bevin on Consequences of Purdue Pharma’s Bankruptcy for Kentuckians


commonwealth of kentucky

Nicole Burton
502-564-2611
Nicole.Burton@ky.gov

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Sept. 16, 2019) – Gov. Matt Bevin today released the following statement about how Purdue Pharma’s bankruptcy filing will impact Kentuckians due to the Kentucky Office of Attorney General’s unscrupulous 2015 settlement:

“Kentuckians woke up this morning to find that they had once again been fleeced by the self-serving corruption of Steve and Andy Beshear and Jack Conway. The crooked $24 million settlement with Purdue Pharma is even more crooked than we thought. The Beshears and Conway carefully negotiated the settlement to ensure that the lawyers were paid $4 million in full, while the Commonwealth had to wait eight years to get its full payment. Purdue’s announced bankruptcy now jeopardizes the paltry remaining money that Kentuckians are due.”

The bankruptcy comes after the announcement that Purdue Pharma settled an opioid lawsuit with the state of Oklahoma for $270 million and had reached a tentative settlement with more than 20 states and 2,000 local governments (of which Kentucky was not a part) for approximately $12 billion.

Questions? Contact us

(KY) General Assembly’s 2020 session to begin Jan. 7


For Immediate Release

September 18, 2019

General Assembly’s 2020 session to begin Jan. 7

FRANKFORT – The schedule for the 2020 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly was approved today by legislative leaders.

The session is scheduled to convene on Jan. 7 and adjourn April 15. It is expected to last 60 legislative days – the maximum allowed by the state constitution in even-numbered years.

Lawmakers will not convene on Jan. 20 in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day or on Feb. 17 in observance of Presidents’ Day.

March 2 will be the final day that House bills can be introduced and March 3 will be the final day for the introduction of Senate bills. Bills that have been introduced by these deadlines will be able to continue moving through the legislative process until the session adjourns.

The veto recess – the period of time in which lawmakers return to their home districts to await possible gubernatorial vetoes of legislation – will run from April 2-13. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on April 14 and 15 for the final two days of the session.

To view the calendar online, go to: https://legislature.ky.gov/Documents/20RS_Calendar.pdf.

–END–

2020 Kentucky Hemp Program Application Period To Open Nov. 15


View as Webpage 

Sean Southard

sean.southard@ky.gov

(502) 782-9253

For Immediate Release

FRANKFORT (Sept. 27, 2019) – Kentucky hemp growers and processors may apply for a hemp license from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s (KDA) hemp program for 2020 beginning November 15, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles announced.

“We are constantly looking for ways to improve our hemp program,” Commissioner Quarles said. “We are making significant changes to the application process for the 2020 growing season to make it work better for Kentucky’s growers and processors. 2019 will be a record-breaking year for Kentucky’s hemp program, and we expect continued growth in 2020.”

Among the major application changes in 2020:

  • KDA will accept grower applications from November 15, 2019, to March 15, 2020.
  • KDA will accept processor/handler applications beginning on November 15, 2019.
  • The KDA will host an online application on its hemp webpage, kyagr.com/hemp.
  • The new online application will include a mapping function.

“Kentucky continues to be the tip of the spear on restoring this crop, but I always remind folks that we are still in the infancy of the restoration. Challenges persist, ranging from federal uncertainty regarding cannabinol to banking and lending issues,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Any business venture – especially in a new industry – carries risk, and the hemp industry is no exception. It is important that our growers and processors remain clear-eyed about the opportunities and challenges ahead of us in the years to come.”

For those interested in learning more about Kentucky’s hemp program, KDA will host a Kentucky Hemp Summit for growers, processors, and other interested parties on December 4, 2019, at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville.

The 2018 Farm Bill removed industrial hemp from the federal Controlled Substances Act, gave hemp growers increased access to USDA programs, and outlined the minimum requirements a state regulatory framework must contain to earn approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The federal Risk Management Agency announced in August that certain hemp growers may obtain insurance coverage under the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection Program in 2020.

For more information about KDA’s hemp research pilot program, go to kyagr.com/hemp .

SOURCE