Cave City voters approve package liquor sales


The Associated Press July 23, 2014

CAVE CITY, Ky. — Voters in Cave City have approved package liquor sales in a local option election.

The Daily News reported (http://bit.ly/1rJWlU5 ) that a total of 230 people voted in favor of allowing package sales with another 132 voting against it.

The results mean that Cave City will be allowed to have two full liquor stores.

The question on the ballot was “Are you in favor of the sale of alcoholic beverages in Cave City, Kentucky?”

By-the-drink alcohol sales have been allowed in Cave City since 2006.

Currently, two restaurants and the Cave City Convention Center are licensed to sell alcohol by the drink.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/07/23/3348034/cave-city-voters-approve-package.html#storylink=cpy

Roaming horses are growing problem


There are many people in Breathitt, Knott and throughout east Kentucky who love horses but have limited space on their own properties to keep them due to the mountainous terrain.

At  the same time, there are many large landowners and coal reclamation sites that could provide lots of grazing area and ideal pastureland.

In the past, there has been a wonderful relationship between local horse owners and large private landowners to free-range one’s horses on someone else’s property.   These horse owners would check on their horses, make sure they were in good health, and either bring them home during the winter months when food was scarce up on the mountain or take both hay, grain and salt blocks to the horses when needed.   And there was an unwritten code that no stallions were to be free-ranged.   But that is no longer the case.

There is a growing number of horses up on reclamation sites.  Some are there with permission, but more and  more are being dropped off without permission by people who may or, in many cases, may not even live in the county.  And these individuals have no intention of checking on their horses, providing health care if they should get hurt or ill,  or for that matter, ever reclaiming them.   These horses have been abandoned.

Some of these horses are old, some are in poor health, but a large majority are in good shape and will live for years.

But it is not just the horses being dropped off that are a problem.  Stallions have been let loose on the reclamation sites and are now impregnating the mares whom, unchecked, may birth colts who grow up into studs and impregnate more mares — and the numbers just keep growing.  If one questions this, go to Mill Creek, Raven, Jones Fork or a number of other reclamation sites throughout the county and count the number of pregnant mares and the growing number of yearlings.   This unchecked growing population of horses has now put into jeopardy the relationship the responsible horse owners once had with the landowners.

A group of people are attempting to inventory all the free–ranging horses in Knott, Breathitt and surrounding counties to determine which horses are owned and which ones have been abandoned.  That way, if horses have already been identified and they end up somewhere they shouldn’t be, like the seven horses last week that ended up down on Ky. 80, six horses noted in the article on this page, or have ventured on still bonded reclamation sites, they could quickly be identified and their owners contacted before any permanent damage is done.  If the horses causing problems have been identified as abandoned then they would be available for immediate adoption to someone that would take responsibility for them.

Find the Troublesome Creek Times at local stores in Knott and surrounding counties or subscribe to the Times at (606)-785-5134

CONTINUE READING…

What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?


 

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FrackingWastePit_BGS_WEB.jpg

 

The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

Ban Fracking in Your Area

No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

Learn More

 

Why the Obama Administration Will Not Admit that Fukushima Radiation is Poisoning Americans | Global Research


Why the Obama Administration Will Not Admit that Fukushima Radiation is Poisoning Americans | Global Research.

We all know that the radiation from the stricken Fukushima plant has spread around the globe and is poisoning people worldwide. We all know that the West Coast of the United States is being polluted with radioactive debris and that the oceans, the beaches that border them, and even the air is becoming more polluted by radioactivity as time goes on.

You have to ask yourself why the government won’t admit this. It’s not like a disaster half a world away is their fault, is it?

Or is it? Could the United States government have done something to prevent the situation getting to this point?

Nothing in this article is a state secret, everything is in the public domain, but the information is so disseminated that it appears disconnected.

Can Legalizing Marijuana Help Appalachia?


By Michael P. Tremoglie

 

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Will legalizing marijuana help or hinder some of the poorest of Americans? Appalachia has long been known for intractable poverty, coal and moonshine. But what many do not know is that marijuana is an Appalachian cash crop.

Some say it will only help; after all, Appalachians make quite a bit of dough from grass. “Outdoor cannabis cultivation is common throughout the Appalachia…region,” reads a June 2007 report by the Department of Justice (DOJ). “The number of outdoor plants eradicated from grow operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia increased from 1,004,329 in 2005 to 1,252,524 in 2006. Cannabis cultivators deliberately locate outdoor grow sites in remote areas of public and private lands to reduce the chance of discovery by passersby or law enforcement and, more commonly, to protect their crops from theft. Cannabis is cultivated in Kentucky on broad areas of privately owned land, in the Daniel Boone National Forest, and on the Cumberland Plateau.”

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What coca leaves are to the mountain people of Peru, marijuana is to the mountain people of America. These growers take their their marijuana cultivation seriously, too. They are not shy about using lethal force to protect it. The DOJ describes some of the efforts to protect crops, “Cannabis cultivators frequently use camouflage, counter surveillance techniques, and booby traps to protect their outdoor grow sites. …These sites are often protected by armed guards who conduct counter surveillance. Moreover, the use of booby traps significantly increased in 2006….some cannabis cultivators used punji sticks, which may be camouflaged by leaves and brush or incorporated into pits and explosive devices, to reduce the risk of crop theft.”

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Steward Will Run For Barren County Judge-Executive; Greer Not Running


“When I think that there is something going on that I think is corrupt, or I think that is inappropriate, or I think the taxpayers’ dollars are being wasted, then I will be contentious and I will be somewhat controversial.”

BARREN COUNTY, Ky. (WBKO) – Barren County Magistrate Chris Steward is adding his name to the mix to become the next Barren County Judge-Executive.

He said his number one priority is bringing jobs to the county.

“We have the infrastructure, we have the land. We have the work force, and I think economic development is a passion of mine,” said Barren County Judge-Executive Candidate Chris Steward.

Steward joins five other candidates in the race, but will not have to face current Judge-Executive Davie Greer, who officially told WBKO Monday, she won’t seek re-election.

“I just feel like at this time in my life that I want to spend more time with my family. They don’t want me to run either, so that’s mostly the reason,” said Barren County Judge-Executive Davie Greer.

Steward certainly has not shied away from the spotlight.

As a magistrate he was out in front of an investigation of the jail.

“When I think that there is something going on that I think is corrupt, or I think that is inappropriate, or I think the taxpayers’ dollars are being wasted, then I will be contentious and I will be somewhat controversial.”

However, Steward does think he could have handled it better.

“I think I owe some apologies to some people in which I voiced my opinion, perhaps I wasn’t as diplomatic as I should have been in certain areas,” said Steward.

WBKO asked, who are some of those people?

“Jailer Mutter, Judge Greer and others, I’m sure I could have worked with them better. I’m sure they could have worked with me better,” said Steward.

Steward announced recently but he said he will officially file Tuesday.

None of the other candidates in the race are current Magistrates, but the list includes democrats Brian Scott Taylor and W.R. Bud Tarry. Republicans in the race include David Honeycutt, Don “Goose” Gossett and Rob Strickland.

CONTINUE READING…

ALSO SEE HERE….

Japanese beverage giant Suntory Holdings has agreed to purchase American spirits maker Jim Beam.


 

 

DEERFIELD, Ill. (AP) – An iconic Kentucky original is being sold to a foreign company.

Japanese beverage giant Suntory Holdings has agreed to purchase American spirits maker Jim Beam. The all-cash deal is valued at $16-billion. Beam stock shot up in premarket trading today after the deal was announced.

Suntory is known for Yamazaki and Hakushu whiskies and Midori liqueur, as well as beers, wines, and soft drinks.

Beam is produced in Clermont, Kentucky, and is known for its brand-name products including Jim Beam bourbon, Maker’s Mark whisky, and Courvoisier cognac.

Suntory already distributes Beam’s products in Japan. Beam distributes Suntory’s products in Singapore and other Asian markets. Both companies’ boards unanimously approved the transaction, which is targeted to close in the second quarter. It needs approval from Beam Inc. stockholders.

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Suntory Holdings To Acquire Beam In $16 Billion Transaction

OSAKA, JAPAN and DEERFIELD, ILLINOIS – JANUARY 13, 2014 – Suntory Holdings Limited and Beam Inc. (NYSE: BEAM) today jointly announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Suntory will acquire all outstanding shares of Beam for US$83.50 per share in cash or total consideration of approximately US$16 billion, including the assumption of Beam’s outstanding net debt.

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Hunters Killed 20 Bears in Kentucky During Season


 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — State Fish and Wildlife officials say hunters in Kentucky claimed 20 black bears during the season that ended in December.

It was the first season with a new expanded bear hunting zone and an archery and crossbow season.

Hunters can now hunt bears in 16 Kentucky counties, up from four counties in 2012.

In the recent season, hunters harvested eight male and two female bears during the firearms season. They took six males and four females during the archery and crossbow season.

Seven were killed in Letcher County, and three bears each were taken in Harlan, Leslie and Perry counties.

Modern-day bear hunting in Kentucky began in 2009.

CONTINUE READING HERE:

Cave City eyes work on strategic plan in ’14


 

Cave City 9.28.13 140

By JUSTIN STORY The Daily News jstory@bgdailynews.com

When it comes to planning for the future, Cave City officials are taking the long view.

Cave City’s City Council plans to hold a special meeting with the Kentucky League of Cities soon after the holidays on a date to be determined to learn about the work that will be involved in drafting a strategic plan that will guide the city’s development during the next several years.

The city’s proximity to Mammoth Cave National Park and its location along Interstate 65 have given Cave City a built-in advantage in attracting tourists, but Mayor Dwayne Hatcher hopes a strategic plan developed in consultation with the League of Cities will shine a light on Cave City’s other attractive qualities.

“We can’t put all our eggs in one basket, so to speak,” Hatcher said. “Tourism is a major factor here with our location, but we can’t just build solely on that. We’re working hard on infrastructure and industry here. … We can no longer be so dependent on tourism, although it is one of the major factors. We have so much more to offer, too.”

Two KLC advisers spoke at a recent council meeting about the benefits of a strategic plan and how the process of creating a plan can draw in the involvement of community members.

The KLC has been active as a consultant with other communities in the state that have drafted their own plans.

In 2011, Williamstown developed a strategic plan with input from community leaders, high school students and others that addressed a number of topics thought to be important to that city’s development, including restoration of downtown and diversification of the local economy.

Hatcher said Cave City’s process of putting together its own plan will involve extensive input and could take several months, if not longer.

“It’s a rather slow process, but it’s well worth doing,” Hatcher said. “With something this important, you don’t want to just rush into it. We want input from all of our citizens. … Hopefully, one thing we’ll create will be more involvement. We want people to feel that they are part of the community.”

Though not a member of Cave City government, Jeff Lawson wears many hats in the community as the owner of Cave Country RV Campground and the president of the Cave City Chamber of Commerce.

Lawson said he was aware the Cave City Convention and Tourism Commission has surveyed visitors for the past several months about their impressions of the area.

“Local people say things like they want more restaurants and more things to do, and visitors comment about empty buildings,” Lawson said. “That’s a real detraction because people come in and, instead of people, they see a dying town, and we don’t see it that way. We have a lot to offer, but for people driving in off the interstate they get the opposite impression.”

Lawson came to Cave City from Pennsylvania more than five years ago, leaving the restaurant business there to operate an RV park in the area. When deciding where to relocate, he centered on Cave City for its small-town atmosphere and its convenience to Mammoth Cave.

Lawson said he believes it’s important for as many people to be involved in the process as possible, and he hopes that the different segments of the community can agree on some common goals for the city’s long-term future.

“For the future, if we have a clear direction of who we are and what we want to accomplish, we can achieve it,” Lawson said.

— Follow reporter Justin Story on Twitter at twitter.com/jstorydailynews or visit bgdailynews.com.

Kentucky has more lakes suspected of having toxic algae


 

 

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. —Kentucky has seven lakes suspected of having excessive levels of toxic algae, but state officials aren’t revealing which bodies of water are being targeted for a second round of tests.

Kentucky environmental regulators are drawing water from the lakes for a second time for more rigorous laboratory analysis after initial samples showed concentrations of blue-green algae worthy of health advisories.

Kentucky Division of Water official Clark Dorman said the lakes involved in the most recent advisory aren’t run by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Five Corps-run lakes were the subject of a recent advisory.

Even though the state’s initial tests suggested health risks to the public, dogs and farm animals, state officials are declining to identify those water bodies.

 

Read more: http://www.wlky.com/news/local-news/louisville-news/ky-has-more-lakes-suspected-of-having-toxic-algae/-/9718340/22411324/-/x31yeb/-/index.html#ixzz2hZAxiMlo

Furry intruder caught on camera (HERE’S THE BEARS!)


 

OHIO COUNTY, KY (WAVE) – A furry intruder was caught on camera in Western Kentucky.

A family went outside and found a black bear raiding their deer-feeder.

Wildlife officials suspect the young bear was either forced out of its territory in eastern Kentucky or Tennessee by another black bear and is wandering around trying to find a girlfriend.

In June, there was a bear sighting near Mammoth Cave and on July 12 five people in Daviess County reported they saw a bear near Masonville.

Experts said the bear appears to be a small and estimate he weighs between 100 and 150 pounds.

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Rare Bible found in Kentucky vault, returned to Notre Dame


Posted: Friday, August 29, 2014 2:30 pm | Updated: 6:00 pm, Fri Aug 29, 2014.

By Ronnie Ellis / CNHI News Service

NERINX, Ky. – Carol Pike isn’t Catholic, and technically she’s not an archivist. She’s a former college and high school librarian and an elder for her Disciples of Christ church in Glasgow, Ky.

So Pike may have been an unlikely figure in what’s best described as the re-discovery of a rare Catholic Bible, which for decades was stored in a vault at the Sisters of Loretto Community here and has since returned to the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind.

Pike spent years cataloging a rare book collection for the Sisters of Loretto, a congregation of nuns and lay co-members who “work for justice and act for peace because the Gospel urges us.” Founded in 1812 as a teaching order, the community’s headquarters  – the “Motherhouse” – is located in the central Kentucky community of Nerinx.

One day the community’s archivist, Sister Eleanor Craig, asked Pike if she’d like to examine some of the books stored in “the vault,” a secure, climate-controlled room in the basement of the infirmary.

After passing through two sets of steel doors, Sister Eleanor pulled a cardboard box labeled “Rare Bibles” from the shelf and handed it to Pike.

As she opened a carefully wrapped volume, Pike had a Eureka moment.

“This is a Carey Bible!” she exclaimed to Sister Eleanor, who didn’t immediately recognize its significance.

Pike realized she was holding a 1790 Catholic Bible – the Douay-Rheims version printed by Philadelphia printer Mathew Carey. He printed only 471 of the Bibles, of which 28 are known to still exist.

The one Pike held was exceptional even among those. The three-volume Bible – two for the Old Testament and a third for the New Testament – was owned by the first Catholic bishop in the United States, Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore. He’d inscribed the Bible to the first Catholic priest ordained in the United States, Father Stephen Badin.

CONTINUE READING STORY…

Glasgow Water Company wins highest Kentucky Rural Water Association honor


Posted: Monday, August 25, 2014 11:12 pm

BY MELINDA J. OVERSTREET Glasgow Daily Times

Glasgow Water Co. has been selected for the highest honor the Kentucky Rural Water Association bestows – the Wooden Bucket Award.

The award is presented to “a water and/or wastewater utility that has made substantial and lasting improvements in providing high levels of customer service and high quality drinking water and wastewater services in its community, including having shown exceptional efforts in meeting the needs of their communities, enhancing their operations, and complying with regulatory requirements,” according to a KRWA press release.

The framed award was presented at a luncheon last week during KRWA’s 35th annual conference and exhibition in Louisville.

“The Glasgow Water Co. is privileged to be nominated with the other finalists and honored to win the Wooden Bucket Award,” said Scott Young, GWC’s general manager. “The award is a demonstration of the direction of our board of directors, the vision of our management staff and an example of the commitment and dedication of all GWC team members.”

Tom Fern, state director of rural development, and Vernon Brown, community programs director, both with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development, presented all 10 finalists with plaques of recognition for outstanding service. The other utilities honored were Wingo Water and Sewer System, Christian County Water District, North Nelson Water District, Boone County Water District, City of Danville, Breathitt County Water District, Boyd County Sanitation No. 4, Southern Madison Water District and Somerset Utilities.

KRWA is a statewide, nonprofit association with offices in Bowling Green and Frankfort that has provided training, technical assistance, advocacy and other services to utilities in Kentucky since 1979. KRWA’s mission is to help water and wastewater utilities help themselves.

Gary Larimore, executive director of KRWA, said the organization tries to recognize utilities within certain categories – such as size and service area – across the state in its selection of finalists, he said.

He said GWC has been an outstanding organization for as long as he can remember, and he has been in his current position since he was hired as KRWA’s first employee 35 years ago.

“They’ve got several projects they’re working on, which tells me they’re looking toward the future and how they can address future regulations,” Larimore said, noting ongoing upgrades to the water and wastewater treatment plants. “They are just continually looking for better ways to serve their customers.”

«12»

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Why Synthetic Marijuana Is More Toxic To The Brain Than Pot


 

 

One of the original chemists who designed synthetic cannabis for research purposes, John W. Huffman, PhD once said that he couldn’t imagine why anyone would try it recreationally. Because of its deadly toxicity, he likened it to playing Russian roulette, and said that those who tried it must be “idiots.” Whether that’s the case or not, the numbers of users is certainly rising, and so are overdoses. New Hampshire has declared a state of emergency, and the number of emergency room visits for overdose from the synthetic drug has jumped. One teen died earlier this month after slipping into a coma, reportedly from using the drug.

Synthetic pot also goes by hundreds of names: Spice, K-2, fake weed, Yucatan Fire, Bliss, Blaze, Skunk, Moon Rocks, and JWH-018, -073 (and other numerical suffixes), after Huffman’s initials. Synthetic cannabis, unlike pot, however, can cause a huge variety of symptoms, which can be severe: Agitation, vomiting, hallucination, paranoia, tremor, seizure, tachycardia, hypokalemia, chest pain, cardiac problems, stroke, kidney damage, acute psychosis, brain damage, and death.

Why are the effects of synthetic cannabis so varied and so toxic? Researchers are starting to understand more about the drugs, and finding that synthetic cannabis is not even close to being the same drug as pot. Its name, which is utterly misleading, is where the similarity ends. Here’s what we know about what synthetic cannabis is doing to the brain, and why it can be deadly.

English: The so called "incense blend&quo...

The so-called “incense blend”: Spice (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1. It’s much more efficient at binding and acting in the brain

One reason that synthetic cannabis can trigger everything from seizures to psychosis is how it acts in the brain. Like the active ingredient in pot, THC, synthetic cannabis binds the CB1 receptor. But when it binds, it acts as a full agonist, rather than a partial agonist, meaning that it can activate a CB1 receptor on a brain cell with maximum efficacy, rather than only partially, as with THC. “The first rule of toxicology is, the dose makes the poison,” says Jeff Lapoint, MD, an emergency room doctor and medical toxicologist. “I drink a cup of water, and I’m fine. I drink gallons of it in some college contest, and I could have a seizure and die. Synthetic cannabinoids are tailor-made to hit cannabinoid receptors – and hit it hard. This is NOT marijuana. Its action in the brain may be similar but the physical effect is so different.”

Another issue with synthetic is its potency, which huge. “Its potency can be up to one hundred or more times greater than THC – that’s how much drug it takes to produce an effect,” says Paul Prather, PhD, professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. “So it takes much less of them to produce maximal effects in the brain. So these things have higher efficacy and potency…These things are clearly very different from THC and thus not surprising that their use may result in development of life-threatening adverse effects.”

2. CB1 receptors are EVERYWHERE in the brain

A central reason that synthetic cannabis can produce such an enormous variety of side effects is likely because CB1 receptors are present in just about every brain region there is. When you have a strong-binding and long-lasting compound going to lots of different areas of the brain, you’re going to get some very bad effects.

Yasmin Hurd, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics, and Neuroscience at Mount Sinai Medical Center, says that the wide distribution of CB1 receptors in the brain is exactly why they’re so toxic. “Where they’re located is important – their presence in the hippocampus would be behind their memory effects; their presence in seizure initiation areas in the temporal cortex is why they lead to seizures. And in the prefrontal cortex, this is probably why you see stronger psychosis with synthetic cannabinoids.” The cardiac, respiratory, and gastrointestinal effects probably come from the CB1 receptors in the brain stem. It might be any one of these that produces the greatest risk of death.

3. A synthetic cannabis overdose looks totally different from a pot “overdose”

The clearest proof that synthetic cannabis is a different thing all together is that overdose with the drug looks totally different from an “overdose” with natural marijuana. “Clinically, they just don’t look like people who smoke marijuana,” says Lewis Nelson, MD, at NYU’s Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology. “Pot users are usually interactive, mellow, funny. Everyone once in a while we see a bad trip with natural marijuana. But it goes away quickly. With people using synthetic, they look like people who are using amphetamines: they’re angry, sweaty, agitated.”

Whatever’s happening, he says, it may be more than just the replacement of THC with JWH. “It’s almost hard to imagine that it could be related to the partial vs. full agonist aspect of the drug.”

4. The body doesn’t know how to deactivate synthetic

One possibility is that the metabolites of synthetic cannabis are also doing damage to the brain. Usually our bodies deactivate a drug as it metabolizes it, but this may not be the case with synthetic. “What we’re finding from our research,” says Prather, “is that some of the metabolites of synthetic cannabis bind to the receptor just as well as the drug itself – this isn’t the case with THC. The synthetic metabolites seem to retain full activity relative to the parent compound. So the ability of our bodies to deactivate them may be decreased.”
He also points out that what’s lacking in synthetic cannabis is cannabidiol, which is present in natural marijuana and appears to blunt some of the adverse actions of the THC. But if it’s not there in synthetic cannabis, then this is one more way the drug’s toxicity may act unchecked.

English: Half a gram of JWH-018.

Half a gram of JWH-018. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

5. Quality control is nonexistent

Synthetic cannabis is made in underground labs, often in China, and probably elsewhere. The only consistent thing is that there’s no quality control in the formulation process. “Is Crazy Monkey today the same as Crazy Monkey tomorrow?” Prather asks. “No way. The makers take some random herb, and spray it with cannabinoid. They’re probably using some cheap sprayer to spray it by hand. How MUCH synthetic cannabis is in there? You have no idea how much you’re getting.” He adds that there are almost always “hot spots” present in the drug – places where the drug is way more concentrated than others. “Plus, there’s almost always more than one synthetic cannabinoid present in these things – usually four or five different ones.” The bottom line: There’s no telling what you’re getting in a bag of Spice or K-2.

6. The drugs are always evolving

“Someone’s just kind of riffing off JWH,” says Lapoint. There are hundreds of different forms of JWH, and of other synthetic cannabinoids designed by different labs, and the next one is always waiting to go. “It only takes a grad school chemist level to pull it off,” he says. “The first JWH in incense blends was found in Germany around 2008 – it was the JWH-018 in Spice. It took months for the local authorities to figure out what was in it and regulate it. The next week incense blends with another compound, JWH-073, came out. They already had it ready to go – and they’re making something that’s not even illegal yet. Since we started the conversation 10 minutes ago, we’re already behind.”

* * *

Would legalizing marijuana kill the synthetic industry?

The demand for a “legal high” has been so great in recent history that it’s set the stage for the synthetic market to take off, says Lapoint. “It’s like the perfect storm. First we created black market by making marijuana illegal. Then there are all these loopholes in the legislation, so you can feed synthetics through when you change one molecule and call it a different drug.” As mentioned, it takes so long for the FDA to catch up – a year or more – that by the time one drug is made illegal, dozens of other iterations of the synthetic are already formulated and poised for release into the market.

His solution is a three-pronged: Changing the laws, by moving form a rule-based to a standards-based system, is the first step. “Right now, you either apply analog act to a new drug or make a new law. There will always be a loophole. So you have to move to standards-base. We really need good designer drug legislation reform.”

The second step is that get the public health message across that synthetic cannabinoids can kill. “Science has a poor understanding of how these drugs will effect you,” says Lapoint, “and the public has an even poorer understanding. People think ‘oh it’s just weed, just fake marijuana.’ Clearly the safety perception is way off. Let parents know, let kids know – this is not the same thing. You are experimenting with unknown compounds. You’re being a guinea pig. It’s not the same chemical, even among same brand. Medically, these drugs are a world of difference from THC.”

The last step, he says, is to continue the legalization discussion. Some states are leading the way. “You have to ask if you’re pushing people towards the scarier thing? The answer is ‘yes.’ It’s like prohibition where people made bathtub gin with methanol. We know people are going to use it. No athlete, soldier, student, or parolee wants to test positive for THC. So they just go to the head shop and get the ‘legal’ kind.”

Of course, it’s not legal at all, and it can lead to irreversible health problems and death. Whether legalization of natural marijuana is the solution isn’t totally clear. But remind your friends or kids that being a human subject in an uncontrolled synthetic drug experiment is just stupid. “This was never intended to be used in people,” says Lapoint. “It even says on the label, ‘Not for human consumption.’ Ironically, that’s the only accurate thing on the label. This is not marijuana. It should not be thought of like marijuana. We have to get this out there: Its effects are serious. It’s a totally different drug.”

Follow me @alicewalton or find me on Facebook.

CONTINUE READING…

Billionaire to Pay $1.5M Fine for Kentucky Mines


Posted: Tue 2:47 PM, Aug 19, 2014

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — West Virginia billionaire Jim Justice has reached a $1.5 million settlement with Kentucky officials over dozens of reclamation violations at several of his coal mines in eastern Kentucky.

The agreement between Justice and the state’s Department for Natural Resources is a reduction from the $4.5 million in outstanding penalties he owed for the violations. Kentucky officials said the violations stemmed from the lack of post-mining restoration work required by law at Justice mines in eight counties.

Justice, who is worth about $1.6 billion according to Forbes.com, has idled several mines in eastern Kentucky and said his Appalachian mines are struggling to stay open due to poor market conditions.

The agreement also requires Justice to post millions in bond and complete the reclamation work by September 2015.

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14TH ANNUAL GLOBAL FEST IN THE BARRENS RETURNS SEPTEMBER 6, 2014


 

Sunday, 17 August 2014 12:44

The 14th annual Global Fest in the Barrens (www.barrenglobalfest.com) returns to Glasgow-Barren County on Saturday, September 6, 2014 from 10:00 A.M. To 5:00 P.M. held on the Glasgow Public Square in Glasgow, Kentucky.  Global Fest is a Celebration of World Cultures and American Unity that promotes interaction among diverse individuals by discovering their similarities and differences. A fun filled day promoting Education, Entertainment, Children’s Activities, sharing and enjoying the Diversity in our community. New this year is recognition of Global Fest Deceased Members. We also welcome Pleasant Valley Baptist, Uno who will sponsor International Games and Crafts for youth and Caveland Church who will sponsor Children’s activities. New entertainment this year is Plain Jane Rock Band, Hector Montenegro, and the Head Liner this year is Perfect Fit Band.

Brother Jordan Woodie from Coral Hill Baptist will provide the Invocation and Julie Ann will sing the National Anthem.

Kentucky Music will provide the Sound System that will fill the air with Gospel Music provided by the Nesbitt Family from Tennessee.  Country Music will be provided by Silver Eagle Band, Author Hatfield and Buck Creek, will provide Blue Grass Music,

Hector Montenegro will sing love songs.

The Head liner this year is Perfect Fit who will present a Genre of R&B, Motown, Blues and Top Hits.

Omega Force Worlds Famous Strong Team will deliver a message of hope.

Sisters with Praise will deliver a message through song and dance.

Children’s World (next to Commonwealth Broadway Building) is sponsored by Glasgow Barren Co. Tourist and Convention Commission, Boys and Girls Club, Big Brother & Big Sister, Pleasant Valley Baptist of Uno, and Cave Land Church. Children will talk to Sponge Bob and Dora the Explorer look a likes. Broadway the Clown will entertain the children with balloons and candy. The Zippy Pets, Train Ride and Bungee Bounce Jump will return this year. Activities for the children will include Face painting, Inflatable, Piñata Burst, and International Crafts and Games.

Cultural Educational Exhibits include: African American, American, African, Chinese,  Japan, Mexican, Native Americans Indians, Nicaragua, Philippine, Thailand, German, Italian, Bosnian and Cambodian, French, and Spanish.   Movies of World Cultures will be showing at George J’s. Passports and Stamps will be available in the Gazebo near the stage.  A prize will be given away to the person who collects all the stamps in the Passport.

Tasty Cuisine will be provided by:  B&D BBQ, New Orleans Style Snowball & BBQ, Tater BBQ, C & D BBQ, Shogun- Japanese, Anna’s Greek Restaurant – Greek, Backyard Party Creation- Carnival food, and Papa John’s Pizza, La Nacional-Mexican Food and Horse Cave Baptist Church Male Ministry-Fish, George J’s Diner-French.

Support Local Glasgow Downtown Businesses. Global Fest welcomes two new restaurants in downtown Glasgow, Shogun and Miqueals Bistro.

The information desk is located on the right of the main stage. Register for door prizes, festival schedule information and Tourist Travel Logs.

Global Fest is a Free Family Community Festival.

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A PLACE ON THE BALLOT, Thursday’s drawing decides name order for nonpartisan candidates


Posted: Thursday, August 14, 2014 10:34 pm

BY MELINDA J. OVERSTREET Glasgow Daily Times

Candidates in nonpartisan races participated Thursday in a drawing to determine ballot positions for the Nov. 4 general election.

The drawing was at the Kentucky secretary of state’s office for candidates who filed there, but each county also had a drawing for local candidates in municipal and school board races.

Proceeding one race at a time, candidates or their proxies drew a number in the order in which they filed to run for their respective offices. In the order indicated by that number, each person then drew another number that determined the ballot position. Anyone who was not present and did not have a proxy designated and submitted by the time the drawing began automatically got the bottom spot on the list.

The party listed first on the ballot for partisan races is determined at the secretary of state’s office according to state law, said Amanda Sturgeon, elections coordinator in the Barren County Clerk’s Office, after the drawings had concluded.

The Caverna Independent Schools district is in both Barren and Hart counties, so the clerks in those counties decide which county will have the drawing to determine ballot positions for board of education candidates in both counties, Sturgeon said. On Thursday, the drawing was in Barren County.

Voters residing within that school district in either county can vote for any of the six candidates, regardless of the candidates’ counties of residence.

Drawings did not take place Thursday for races with only enough candidates to fill the available seats – such as the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education, which has three slots and three candidates.

The ballot positions determined in Thursday’s drawing – in the order of the drawings – in the Fiscal Court Chambers in the Barren County Government Center are:

Glasgow City Council

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After a toxin from blue-green algae shut down Toledo’s water system, regulators in Kentucky and Indiana take a look at their states’ drinking water utilities.


Kentucky steps up response to toxic algae risks

James Bruggers, jbruggers@courier-journal.com  2:04 p.m. EDT August 15, 2014

When toxic algae left 500,000 people in the Toledo, Ohio, area without drinking water for two days this month, one of Kentucky’s top environmental regulators took notice.

“I was sitting there on a Friday evening, hearing various things from various counterparts, and I was thinking this can happen in my state,” recalled R. Bruce Scott, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. “What are we doing to be prepared?”

First thing the following Monday, Scott put that question to his staff, and Kentucky officials have been working since to get answers by combing through documents filed by many of the state’s 467 public drinking water systems, and reaching out to some with questions.

The inquiry steps up Kentucky’s response to its emerging problem of toxic algae blooms, first documented in the state in late 2012 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Taylorsville Lake.

The review puts drinking water safety front and center, in addition to state and Army Corps concerns about recreational exposure to blue-green algae — a cyanobacteria that can produce toxins causing skin or eye irritation, nausea, flu-like symptoms and liver damage.

The blooms occur with sunlight, slow-moving water and too many nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They’re made worse by pollution from sewage treatment plants, septic systems and runoff from fertilized farms and lawns.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Toxic algae makes a comeback at Kentucky and Indiana lakes

For the second year in a row, Kentucky and the corps have issued recreational advisories on some lakes because of the blooms. In all, 10 Kentucky lakes carry the warnings, including Barren River, Nolin River, Green River, Rough River and Guist Creek lakes.

None is closed to swimming, fishing or boating. Instead, authorities advise not swallowing lake water and washing well after swimming.

Source water concerns

In response to a Kentucky Open Records request, state officials acknowledged 10 public drinking water systems serving thousands of customers in Kentucky are drawing water from lakes with algae advisories.

They include the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, Edmonson County Water District and the Grayson County Water District.

State officials said they know of no immediate drinking water threats from algae anywhere in Kentucky. And officials with the Louisville Water Co. — which provides water to about 850,000 people in Louisville and parts of Bullitt, Nelson, Oldham, Shelby and Spencer counties — said they do not have any issues with toxic algae.

But state officials said they want all Kentucky drinking water providers to be ready to handle algae problems, and that is why they are taking a closer look at Kentucky’s drinking water systems.

State officials acknowledged even more systems could be at potential risk, where monitoring for toxic algae has not yet occurred. And Scott said there could be gaps in technology or expertise at some utilities, especially smaller systems with fewer resources.

“We need to make sure we are properly educating and informing our smaller systems of what they need to do,” Scott said. “We are asking what can and should be done to make sure we are looking at everything that needs to be looked at.”

If Kentucky water utilities don’t have procedures for analyzing their source water for the different types of toxic algae, state officials recommend developing some.

Scott said they want to make sure all systems understand what treatment methods work, and have an emergency response plan if their water becomes unsafe for drinking.

Rural water systems contacted by The Courier-Journal said their customers don’t need to worry.

“We are staying on top of it,” said Tom Dole, general manager of the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, which draws water from Guist Creek Lake.

“We are not experiencing … anything like the conditions that we read (about) and saw in Toledo,” said Kevin Shaw, general manager of the Grayson County Water District, which draws from Rough River Lake. “You could look at the water and see the algae. That is not the case in our reservoir.”

Indiana’s Department of Environmental Management surveyed its 33 public water utilities that rely on lakes in the wake of Toledo’s crisis, said Barry Sneed, IDEM spokesman. Bloomington’s water system was concerned about algae, so new samples were taken but no toxins or algae were detected, he added.

“We plan to keep in contact with systems that may be susceptible to algal blooms and if problems arise, we will work with the system to ensure treatment is adjusted to any address possible algal toxins,” he said.

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Map of Kentucky and Inidiana lakes with elevated toxic algae

Prevention

Besides ensuring drinking water utilities are prepared, experts say Kentucky needs to do more to prevent the blooms.

“We need to step up our game,” said Gail Brion, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Kentucky with an expertise in water-borne illnesses and water treatment.

She said the state needs to better curb the nitrogen and phosphorous that gets into waterways from sewage, animal waste, fertilizers and other sources.

“Once a bloom has happened, it is too late,” she said. “The toxins persist in the environment months after formation, so even if the algae leave, the toxins can remain.”

Scott said Kentucky regulators know they need better control of nutrient pollution and his department is working on a nutrient-management plan to do just that.

But environmentalists worry the state won’t adopt stringent enough pollution limits and that state environmental agency budgets will continue, further putting Kentucky communities at risk of a drinking water crises.

“We need limits on pollutants and inspectors on the ground,” said Judy Petersen, executive director of the Kentucky Waterways Alliance, which has joined other groups in suing the EPA over nutrient pollution in the Mississippi Basin, including Kentucky and Indiana. Otherwise, she said, Kentucky residents “are rolling the dice” on safe drinking water.

When it comes to cyanobacteria, it quickly gets complicated.

The toxin that wreaked havoc in northern Ohio — microcystin — can be produced by a variety of blue-green algae, not just the Microcystic found in Lake Erie. And other types of blue-green algae have different toxins that can cause health problems.

Toledo draws water from a shallow area of Lake Erie that became inundated by blue-green algae that produced microcystin, said Greg Boyer, chair of the chemistry department at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in New York.

The city’s water utility had no ability to switch to another intake, where there was less blue-green algae, said Boyer, who is also acting director for the Great Lakes Research Consortium, a research network.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency had warned Toledo about problems with its aging treatment system in June, writing to the city’s mayor of “the precarious condition” of the system and its “imminent vulnerability to failure.”

Boyer said utilities should monitor for the types of blue-green algae that can produce toxins. He said equipment can be bought for $5,000 to $25,000 that can provide a continuous flow of toxic algae data.

“Then, at what point do you worry about it? We deal, in most cases, where the blooms have to be fairly thick,” he said. “When you can see it.”

Further complicating matters, Scott said, is that the EPA has yet to establish a uniform testing method for the algae toxins, or safe drinking water standards. EPA is working on that, but “we believe they need to accelerate their decision making based on what we are seeing in Toledo and other places, including Kentucky,” Scott said.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Toxic algae effects and precautions

Taylorsville Lake in Spencer County, a popular summer destination for water recreation, has fallen victim to an invasive and toxic algae over the past year. (Photo: Marty Pearl/Special to The CJ)

Louisville preparations

The Louisville Water Co. has an algae response plan that involves close tracking of algae in the Ohio River when it may be present: April to November.

The company’s aquatic ecologist, Roger Tucker, checks water samples through a microscope to determine what types of algae may be in the water, and whether they might cause any problems.

So far, the only algae problems Louisville Water has experienced comes from those that can make water taste or smell bad, Tucker said. This year, he said, there has been hardly any algae in the company’s river water.

Rivers are also less likely to have algae blooms because their water doesn’t get stagnant, said the water company’s chief scientist, Rengao Song. Sediment that often turns the Ohio brown blocks sunlight, preventing algae from growing, he said.

The water company’s Crescent Hill Treatment Plant is well-equipped to remove algae and any algae-caused toxins or chemicals that cause taste and odor changes, with processes that include absorptive activated carbon, he said.

Louisville also gets 30 percent of its water from wells deep under the Ohio River, where sand and gravel naturally filter tiny contaminants, including algae. That water feeds the company’s B.E. Payne treatment plant.

The water company is now working with engineering consultants on preliminary engineering for riverbank filtration for its Crescent Hill plant. Such a system should have no risk from toxic algae, Song said.

“The Louisville Water Co. has never detected any algae cells in its riverbank filtration water,” Song said.

Reach reporter James Bruggers at (502) 582-4645 or on Twitter @jbruggers.

Kentucky water systems that draw from lakes with toxic algae advisories:

• Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission (Guist Creek Lake)

• Springfield Water Works (Willisburg Lake)

• Glasgow Water Co. and Scottsville Water Department (Barren River Lake)

• Edmonson County Water District (Nolin River Lake)

• Columbia/Adair County Regional Water Commission and Campbellsville Municipal Water (Green River Lake)

• Grayson County Water District and Litchfield Water Works (Rough River Lake)

• Mount Sterling Water Works (Greenbriar Creek Reservoir)

Source: Kentucky Division of Water

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